Indianism

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In·di·an·ism

 (ĭn′dē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. A word or phrase characteristic of English as spoken in India.
2. Devotion to or preference for the people and culture of India.
3. Devotion to traditional Native American culture or cultures.

In′di·an·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Indianism

the customs or traditions of Indians, especially American Indians. — Indianist, n.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Understandably, since its use is so prevalent some dictionaries, including the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionaries, have given it the okay and classified it under Indian English terms that are used informally.
The 6th round of home minister-level talks was held in Dhaka in October last year when Indian Home Minister Rajnath Singh led the Indian side.An Indian English daily adds: Indian Home Minister Amit Shah Shah is known to have a tough stand on the issue of unabated illegal immigration from Bangladesh.
It has been used widely in Indian English for many decades, with one of its earliest recorded airings in the Indian parliament records dating back to the 1960s.
To further improve their service in India, the upcoming iOS 13 will allow Siri to talk and understand Indian English. It will include support on maps for navigation and other productivity application. 
It can now also understand the Indian English accent.
"There is an assumption that a native variety of English is somehow 'better' or more 'superior' to other varieties of English such as Indian English or Arabic English.
A leading Indian English daily newspaper The Hindu in a comment published in its issue of 15th July interpreted it as new equation between the two countries.
Other top 'well, I've never heard THAT before' phrases include the Welsh English term 'jibbons' - which means spring onions - and the frankly wonderful 'chuddies' from the OED's Indian English section meaning undies.
Other top 'well, I've never heard THAT before' phrases include the term 'jibbons' - which, in parts of Wales, means spring onions - and the frankly wonderful 'chuddies' from the OED's Indian English section meaning undies.
He observed that 'there are many Englishes' and gave the examples of 'Pakistani English', 'Indian English' etc.
Mistrusted by English critics--"Matthew Arnold in a sari"--and by English-speaking Indians, Indian English writing appeared to be doomed to a perpetual search for identity (298).
Surely, the Indian English newspapers likeTHE INDIAN EXPRESS and magazines like FRONTLINE often interviewing big personalities from Pakistan will add to this interesting fact.

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