Indian gooseberry


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Indian gooseberry

n.
A tree (Phyllanthus emblica) of subtropical South and Southeast Asia bearing small round sour fruits divided by vertical lines into six to eight segments, valued in Ayurvedic medicine and as an ingredient in various condiments. Also called amla, emblic.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A study published in the BMC Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in January demonstrated the efficacy and safety of Tri-Low full extract of amla (Phyllanthus emblica), Indian gooseberry, in alleviating dyslipidemia, a contributing risk factor to the development of atherosclerosis.
Amla or Indian gooseberry is a fruit indigenous to the Indian subcontinent.
Some examples of such foods are Indian gooseberry, wood apple, cherry plum, beleric fruit, pomegranate, apple, dates, garlic, asparagus, lotus, dry ginger, tender wild meat, milk, nuts and legumes.
Indian gooseberry, a herb also known as amalaki or amla, is an antioxidant.
For Mili, it's an amla, or Indian gooseberry, that triggers her series of recollections of growing up in India, much like Marcel Proust's madeleine in Remembrance of Things Past.
Amla, or Indian gooseberry as it is widely known, is mentioned in Ayurvedic texts for the treatment of many ailments.
Vicco Vajradanti Ayurvedic Toothpaste, for instance, contains therapeutic ingredients including babool bark, Indian medlar, blackberry, cloves, Bengal madder, jujube bark, walnut bark, mayweed plant, Indian liquorice root, bishop's weed, cinnamon, cutch tree bark, sappan wood, chebulic myrobalan, vajradanti bark, Indian sarsaparilla, Indian gooseberry, berelic myrobalans, cubeb and oak, says Pendharkar.
There are pomegranate, mango, jujube and Indian gooseberry as well as many medicinal plants.
Similar to cabbage, you can also make use of Indian gooseberry to alleviate the troubles due to hyperglycemia.
Balkrishna narrated the story of how Baba Ramdev promised to buy amla (Indian gooseberry) from some farmers in Uttarakhand to prevent the cutting of its trees.
The suit alleges that the product, which was said to include a derivative of Indian gooseberry, is filled with a "dangerous mix of irritants and potentially toxic substances" instead of the advertised oils.
I am guessing that his smooth skin gets a daily dousing with the muchpublicised Indian gooseberry serum.

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