Indo-European


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Related to Indo-European: Indo-European languages

In·do-Eu·ro·pe·an

 (ĭn′dō-yo͝or′ə-pē′ən)
n.
1.
a. A family of languages consisting of most of the languages of Europe as well as those of Iran, the Indian subcontinent, and other parts of Asia.
b. Proto-Indo-European.
2. A member of any of the peoples speaking an Indo-European language.

In′do-Eu′ro·pe′an adj.

Indo-European

adj
1. (Languages) denoting, belonging to, or relating to a family of languages that includes English and many other culturally and politically important languages of the world: a characteristic feature, esp of the older languages such as Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit, is inflection showing gender, number, and case
2. (Languages) denoting or relating to the hypothetical parent language of this family, primitive Indo-European
3. (Peoples) denoting, belonging to, or relating to any of the peoples speaking these languages
n
4. (Languages) the Indo-European family of languages
5. (Languages) Also called: primitive Indo-European or Proto-Indo-European the reconstructed hypothetical parent language of this family
6. (Peoples) a member of the prehistoric people who spoke this language
7. (Historical Terms) a member of the prehistoric people who spoke this language
8. (Peoples) a descendant of this people or a native speaker of an Indo-European language

In•do-Eu•ro•pe•an

(ˈɪn doʊˌyʊər əˈpi ən)

n.
1. a family of languages spoken or formerly spoken in Europe and SW, central, and S Asia, and carried by colonization and conquest since c1500 to many other parts of the world: major branches of Indo-European are Anatolian, Indo-Iranian, Armenian, Greek, Slavic, Baltic, Albanian, Germanic, Tocharian, Italic, and Celtic.
2. a member of any of the peoples speaking an Indo-European language.
3.
a. the language ancestral to the Indo-European languages; Proto-Indo-European. Abbr.: IE
b. a speaker of this language.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to Indo-European or its speakers.
[1814]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Indo-European - a member of the prehistoric people who spoke Proto-Indo European
primitive, primitive person - a person who belongs to an early stage of civilization
2.Indo-European - the family of languages that by 1000 BC were spoken throughout Europe and in parts of southwestern and southern Asia
natural language, tongue - a human written or spoken language used by a community; opposed to e.g. a computer language
Proto-Indo European, PIE - a prehistoric unrecorded language that was the ancestor of all Indo-European languages
Albanian - the Indo-European language spoken by the people of Albania
Armenian language, Armenian - the Indo-European language spoken predominantly in Armenia, but also in Azerbaijan
Illyrian - a minor and almost extinct branch of the Indo-European languages; spoken along the Dalmatian coast
Thraco-Phrygian - an extinct branch of the Indo-European language family thought by some to be related to Armenian
Balto-Slavic, Balto-Slavic language, Balto-Slavonic - a family of Indo-European languages including the Slavic and Baltic languages
Germanic, Germanic language - a branch of the Indo-European family of languages; members that are spoken currently fall into two major groups: Scandinavian and West Germanic
Celtic, Celtic language - a branch of the Indo-European languages that (judging from inscriptions and place names) was spread widely over Europe in the pre-Christian era
Italic language, Italic - a branch of the Indo-European languages of which Latin is the chief representative
Tocharian - a branch of the Indo-European language family that originated in central Asia during the first millennium A.D.
Indo-Iranian, Indo-Iranian language - the branch of the Indo-European family of languages including the Indic and Iranian language groups
Anatolian, Anatolian language - an extinct branch of the Indo-European family of languages known from inscriptions and important in the reconstruction of Proto-Indo European
Greek, Hellenic, Hellenic language - the Hellenic branch of the Indo-European family of languages
Adj.1.Indo-European - of or relating to the Indo-European language family
2.Indo-European - of or relating to the former Indo-European people; "Indo-European migrations"
Translations

Indo-European

[ˈɪndəʊˌjʊərəˈpiːən]
A. ADJindoeuropeo
B. N
1.indoeuropeo/a m/f
2. (Ling) → indoeuropeo m
References in classic literature ?
If we trace any Indo-European language back far enough, we arrive hypothetically (at any rate according to some authorities) at the stage when language consisted only of the roots out of which subsequent words have grown.
In some languages, according to some authorities, the distinction of parts of speech does not exist; in many languages it is widely different from that to which we are accustomed in the Indo-European languages.
Sayce maintained that all European philosophy since Aristotle has been dominated by the fact that the philosophers spoke Indo-European languages, and therefore supposed the world, like the sentences they were used to, necessarily divisible into subjects and predicates.
The Indo-European word meant grief, and it traces to mortality.
The Old Persian of the Achaemenian Empire, preserved in a number of cuneiform inscriptions, was an Indo-European tongue with close affinities with Sanskrit and Avestan (the language of the Zoroastrian sacred texts).
Martinez and de Vaan introduce comparative and Indo-European linguists to the Iranian language that most of the original texts of Zoroastrianism are written in.
C is largely based on knowledge of the texts of ancient Indo-European languages, like Latin, Greek and Sanskrit.
Franquemont, the first known Indo-European female batik entrepreneur.
An Indo-European joint initiative for strengthening networking on Biomass Research and Bio-waste valorisation for sustainable bio-based economy was initiated through 'SAHYOG' under the joint sponsorship of European Commission and Government of India's Department of Biotechnology.
They hold to the theory that Indo-European was spread by warriors from the steppes north of the Black Sea.
Digging deep into ancient history, he comes up with a provocative argument: the cultural roots of what later evolved into the European Miracle should be traced back to the social ethos of the Indo-European warrior aristocracy, which he considers an "unusual class with a strong libertarian spirit" (p.
Related are Indo-European *tAlk- and Altaic *telenu for 'narrating' and 'tale'.

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