Inermis

In`er´mis


a.1.(Bot.) Unarmed; destitute of prickles or thorns, as a leaf.
References in classic literature ?
2862), has described a variety of the Cynara from this part of South America under the name of inermis. He states that botanists are now generally agreed that the cardoon and the artichoke are varieties of one plant.
In May 1998, 4 common grasses on the Plateau, smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis, BI), siberian wildryegrass (Elymus sibricus, ES), drooping wildryegrass (Elymus nutans, EN), and crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum, AC) were combined in 3 mixtures with different compositions and seed rates as follows: 38 kg/ha of BI + 56 kg/ha of EN (BI + EN); 38 kg/ha of BI + 14 kg/ha of ES + 23 kg/ha of AC (BI + ES + AC); and 19 kg/ha of BI + 14 kg/ha of ES + 28 kg/ha of EN + 23 kg/ha of AC (BI + ES + EN + AC).
(1793), with his description of the new species Cycas inermis, based on
inermis 'Shademaster' Sunburst Gleditsia triacanthos T var.
Henna (Lawsonia inermis) in its pure form has a very low allergic potential.
The key to its potential popularity could be summed up by the adjective "thornless." Most native honeylocust species have serious thorns on their roots, trunks, and branches, hut the nursery industry cast an approving eye on the thornless common variety (Gleditsia triacanthos), specifically the variation called 'Inermis."
Reddish dye obtained from the powdered leaves of the tree Lawsonia inermis (5)
2:00 IMPACTS OF COLIFORM BACTERIA AND LIMESTONE SEDIMENT ON ORCONECTES INERMIS INERMIS (DECAPODA: CAMBARIDAE) IN PLESS CAVE, LAWRENCE COUNTY, IN.
The product, which is made from the dried leaves of Lawsonia inermis, is increasingly being used in Europe and the United States for skin painting as a temporary alternative to tattooing.
Cockspur hawthorn (Crataegus crus-gaiff 'Inermis').