Inevidence

In`ev´i`dence


n.1.Lack of evidence; obscurity.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
He bound her wrists and then raped her, the girl said inevidence at the High Court in Dundee on the first day of the Barker's trial.
But again their tendency to draw rather than win, that has proved costly, was inevidence. With just four games left to the end of the season, there is little more than pride to play for.
But McCracken made a mistake inevidence from one of his team-mates, Capucho, since he signed from Porto in a pounds 650,000 summer move.
This summer marked the first season at Santa Fe Opera with Richard Gaddes at the helm, but the imprint of the long-serving John Crosby was still very much inevidence, from the mix of repertoire to the presence of Crosby himself as guest conductor in his beloved annual Strauss offering, in this case Die Aegyptische Helena, which received an opulent, high-camp production.