infant baptism


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infant baptism

n. Christianity
The belief in or the practice of baptizing people during infancy rather than later in life. Also called pedobaptism.
References in classic literature ?
An occasional burst of fervor in Dissenting pulpits on the subject of infant baptism was the only symptom of a zeal unsuited to sober times when men had done with change.
Between the fourth and the seventeenth centuries the dissenting groups were not called "Baptist," according to spiritual kinship adherents, but did share "Baptist-like" qualities such as congregational autonomy, rejection of infant baptism and clerical hierarchy, and opposition to a state church.
How many times must it be pointed out that infant baptism doesn't warrant a person being declared a Christian?
Whether at infant baptism or dedication, those little ones were given to our God.
Since the 16th century, baptism has been a dividing issue among churches, especially (but not only) between churches which practice infant baptism and churches which do not.
He offers neither an apology for infant baptism nor a trite attempt to promote an archaic rite; rather he shows that becoming like a child ignites imagination and capacitates in each Christian to confront what is new.
To make his point, he appeals to the rise of the Anabaptists and the political conflicts they faced in attempting to promote their belief in believer's baptism over infant baptism, a belief that often had them at odds with the prevailing laws of the time.
Making Waves in the Baptismal Font: Karl Barth and Infant Baptism.
The most extensive answers (just over three pages each) address infant baptism and real presence, reflecting the strong Lutheran emphasis on the sacraments as means of grace.
A linen handkerchief used at the groom's infant baptism, was tucked inside the bouquet The groom wore a unique cotton blossom boutonniere.
In his Exposure of the Babylonian Whore, for example, Pilgram Marpeck denounced Constantine's conversion as setting in place a fateful fusion between ecclesial and temporal power marked by the introduction of infant baptism, the substitution of Mass for the Lord's Supper, and, most troubling of all, a new readiness on the part of the church to resort to coercion and lethal violence in matters of faith.
The practice emerged only when infant baptism became widespread, as an outgrowth of the sponsores employed in adult baptism.