botulism

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Related to Infant botulism: Clostridium botulinum

bot·u·lism

 (bŏch′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A severe, sometimes fatal food poisoning caused by ingestion of food containing botulin and characterized by nausea, vomiting, disturbed vision, muscular weakness, and fatigue.

[German Botulismus, from Latin botulus, sausage.]

botulism

(ˈbɒtjʊˌlɪzəm)
n
(Pathology) severe poisoning from ingestion of botulin, which affects the central nervous system producing difficulty in swallowing, visual disturbances, and respiratory paralysis: often fatal
[C19: first formed as German Botulismus literally: sausage poisoning, from Latin botulus sausage]

bot•u•lism

(ˈbɒtʃ əˌlɪz əm)

n.
a disease of the nervous system acquired from spoiled foods in which botulin is present, esp. improperly canned foods.
[1875–80; < German Botulismus < Latin botul(us) sausage]

bot·u·lism

(bŏch′ə-lĭz′əm)
A severe, sometimes fatal food poisoning caused by eating food infected with a bacterium that produces a powerful nerve toxin. The bacterium grows in food that has been improperly preserved. ♦ The nerve toxin produced by this bacterium is called botulin (bŏch′ə-lĭn).

botulism

a disease of the nervous system caused by botulin developments in spoiled foods eaten by animals and man; a variety of bacterial food poisoning.
See also: Poison
a toxic condition caused by a neurotoxin in improperly canned or preserved food.
See also: Food and Nutrition
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.botulism - food poisoning from ingesting botulin; not infectious; affects the CNS; can be fatal if not treated promptly
food poisoning, gastrointestinal disorder - illness caused by poisonous or contaminated food
Translations

botulism

[ˈbɒtjʊlɪzəm] Nbotulismo m

botulism

[ˈbɒtʃʊlɪzəm] nbotulisme m

botulism

botulism

[ˈbɒtjʊˌlɪzəm] nbotulismo

bot·u·lism

n. botulismo, intoxicación ocasionada por la ingestión de alimentos contaminados por Clostridium botulinum que se desarrolla en alimentos que no son propiamente conservados.

botulism

n botulismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that approximately 145 cases are reported annually in the United States (U.S.), out of which, at least 65% are infant botulism. On that note, the expanding patient pool is expected to elevate the market growth in the coming years.
Dr Lewis added that babies under one year should not be given honey due to the risk of infant botulism.
, which can multiply in a baby's immature digestive system, and has previously been implicated in some cases of infant botulism.
(But don't feed honey to infants under a year old, due to the risk of infant botulism.) Likewise, information that has been properly prepared and distilled is always seen as valuable by our clients.
It must not be given to infants below one year of age to prevent infant botulism.
First case of infant botulism caused by Clostridium baratii type F in California.
All of those are rare; the most common is infant botulism, with foodborne following afterward.
Infant botulism was suspected and Botulism Immune Globulin Intravenous (Human) (BIG-IV), licensed for the treatment of infant botulism types A and B, was administered on hospital day 2.
Infant botulism is a common form of botulism, which can attack the intestinal system.
Finally, there is infant botulism, which results from neurotoxin produced by C.
Six forms of botulism have been described in the literature (8), but only foodborne and infant botulism and rare cases of adult colonization have been reported in Canada (1,9).