Infantlike

In´fant`like`


a.1.Like an infant.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The authors suggest that the inner eyebrow-raising movement triggers a nurturing response in humans because it makes the dogs' eyes appear larger, more infantlike and also resembles a movement humans produce when they are sad." Psychologist Dr Juliane Kaminski, who led the research which is published in the American journal PNAS, said: "The evidence is compelling that dogs developed a muscle to raise the inner eyebrow after they were domesticated from wolves.
Finally, Paul Ruvolo from Bryn Mawr College spoke about learning models of infant-mother interaction, with applications to generation of infantlike behavior on a robot and detection of abnormal development in infants.
Children's stories increasingly portrayed bears as cuddly and infantlike. When Roosevelt received an honorary degree at Cambridge University, a mammoth teddy bear descended onto the stage.
Yet his praise of the "divine eloquence" of the Gospels does not necessarily prevent him from regarding biblical text as a literary text like any other, available to the poet's probing intellect; nor does his respect for Christ's "meekness of spirit, sweetness of eloquence and infantlike simplicity of heart" (64) necessarily mean that he himself aspired to attain these same qualities (indeed, we have already seen in "Mirskaia vlast'" that he rejects them).