inflection

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inflection

Grammatical inflection (sometimes known as accidence or flection in more traditional grammars) is the way in which a word is changed or altered in form in order to achieve a new, specific meaning.
Verbs are the most commonly inflected words, changing form to reflect grammatical tense, as well as mood, voice, aspect, person, and speech. Collectively, this is known as conjugation.
The other parts of speech that can undergo inflection are nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs. These are categorized collectively under the term declension.
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in·flec·tion

 (ĭn-flĕk′shən)
n.
1. The act of inflecting or the state of being inflected.
2. Alteration in pitch or tone of the voice.
3. Grammar
a. An alteration of the form of a word by the addition of an affix, as in English dogs from dog, or by changing the form of a base, as in English spoke from speak, that indicates grammatical features such as number, person, mood, or tense.
b. An affix indicating such a grammatical feature, as the -s in the English third person singular verb form speaks.
c. The paradigm of a word.
d. A pattern of forming paradigms, such as noun inflection or verb inflection.
4. A turning or bending away from a course or position of alignment.

in·flec′tion·al adj.
in·flec′tion·al·ly adv.

inflection

(ɪnˈflɛkʃən) or

inflexion

n
1. modulation of the voice
2. (Grammar) (grammar) a change in the form of a word, usually modification or affixation, signalling change in such grammatical functions as tense, voice, mood, person, gender, number, or case
3. an angle or bend
4. the act of inflecting or the state of being inflected
5. (Mathematics) maths a change in curvature from concave to convex or vice versa. See also point of inflection
inˈflectional, inˈflexional adj
inˈflectionally, inˈflexionally adv
inˈflectionless, inˈflexionless adj

in•flec•tion

(ɪnˈflɛk ʃən)

n.
1. modulation of the voice; change in pitch or tone of voice.
2.
a. the process of adding affixes to or changing the shape of a base to give it a different syntactic function without changing its form class, as in forming served from serve, sings from sing, or harder from hard (contrasted with derivation).
b. an affix added in this process, as the -s in dogs or the -ed in played.
c. an inflected form of a word.
d. the systematic description of the process of inflection in a language; accidence.
3. a bend or angle.
4. a change of curvature from convex to concave or vice versa.
Also, esp. Brit., inflexion.
[1525–35]

inflection

A change in the form of a word that indicates a different tense or number.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inflection - a change in the form of a word (usually by adding a suffix) to indicate a change in its grammatical function
grammatical relation - a linguistic relation established by grammar
conjugation - the inflection of verbs
declension - the inflection of nouns and pronouns and adjectives in Indo-European languages
paradigm - systematic arrangement of all the inflected forms of a word
pluralisation, pluralization - the act of pluralizing or attributing plurality to
2.inflection - the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
manner of speaking, delivery, speech - your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally; "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"; "her speech was barren of southernisms"; "I detected a slight accent in his speech"
intonation, pitch contour, modulation - rise and fall of the voice pitch
caesura - a break or pause (usually for sense) in the middle of a verse line
enjambement, enjambment - the continuation of a syntactic unit from one line of verse into the next line without a pause
stress, accent, emphasis - the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch); "he put the stress on the wrong syllable"
speech rhythm, rhythm - the arrangement of spoken words alternating stressed and unstressed elements; "the rhythm of Frost's poetry"
3.inflection - deviation from a straight or normal course
deviation, difference, divergence, departure - a variation that deviates from the standard or norm; "the deviation from the mean"
4.inflection - a manner of speaking in which the loudness or pitch or tone of the voice is modifiedinflection - a manner of speaking in which the loudness or pitch or tone of the voice is modified
manner of speaking, delivery, speech - your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally; "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"; "her speech was barren of southernisms"; "I detected a slight accent in his speech"

inflection

noun
1. intonation, stress, emphasis, beat, measure, rhythm, cadence, modulation, accentuation His voice was devoid of inflection.
2. (Grammar) conjugation, declension Around 2 years, the child adds many grammatical inflections.

inflection

noun
A particular vocal quality that indicates some emotion or feeling:
Idiom: tone of voice.
Translations
flexeohýbání
afvigelsemodulation
flexióninflexiónpunto de inflexión
käännepistesuunnanmuutostaivutus
fleksijainfleksijaotklon
beygingraddblær
modulacjaodmiana

inflection

[ɪnˈflekʃən] Ninflexión f

inflection

[ɪnˈflɛkʃən] n
[voice] → inflexion f
(GRAMMAR) (= ending) → désinence f

inflection

[ɪnˈflɛkʃn] n (of voice) → intonazione f, modulazione f (Gram) → flessione f
the inflection of nouns/verbs → la flessione nominale/verbale
point of inflection (Math) → punto di flesso
References in classic literature ?
He will express a phrase in a word, and he will qualify the meaning of an entire sentence by a syllable; he will even convey different significations by the simplest inflections of the voice.
It cost me so much trouble, however, to dig the sense out of the grammar and lexicon, as I went on with the authors I was impatient to read, that I remember the words very well in all their forms and inflections, and I have still what I think I may call a fair German vocabulary.
The dark eye of the old warrior was dancing in his head with a wild animation, and the sluggish repose in which his aged frame had been resting in the canoe was now changed to all the rapid inflections of practiced agility.
His voice sank into the tenderest inflections, his smile expressed a thoughtful, fatherly admiration, whenever he spoke to Laura or to me.
There was no change of attitude, no gesture; the effect of her speech was produced entirely by the inflections of her voice, and when she came to the question, "Will God take care of us when we die?
Then in the increasing gale of the sea there would be a little private ship's storm going on in which you could detect strong language, pronounced in a tone of passion and exculpatory protestations uttered with every possible inflection of injured innocence.
Then would come the rhythm--a clapping of hands; the beating of a stick upon a log; the example of one that leaped with repetitions; or the chanting of one that uttered, explosively and regularly, with inflection that rose and fell, "A-bang, a-bang
For instance, whether or not there is an open passage from the nostrils to the mouth, the only character, according to Owen, which absolutely distinguishes fishes and reptiles--the inflection of the angle of the jaws in Marsupials--the manner in which the wings of insects are folded--mere colour in certain Algae--mere pubescence on parts of the flower in grasses--the nature of the dermal covering, as hair or feathers, in the Vertebrata.
Her voice was high and rather shrill, and she often spoke with an anxious inflection, for she was exceedingly desirous that everything should go with due order and decorum.
said Sir Nathaniel, and settled down to listen, looking at Adam steadily and listening attentively that he might miss nothing-- even the inflection of a word.
Then she started off on a regular catechism, if I could judge by her inflection, for I certainly understood no word of what she said.
Presently she looked up and answered, with a rising inflection implying a shade of uncertainty,