Ingerland

Ingerland

(ˈɪŋɡəˌlənd) or

Ingerlund

n
(Placename) informal a jocular spelling of England, as pronounced in the chants of sports, esp football, supporters
References in periodicals archive ?
It's a trivial example but I support Sunderland football club - I don't care about "Ingerland".
By far the worst thing about a major finals without us is we have to put up with the English Broadcasting Corporation and Ingerland TV on the other side.
We should pick the best under-25s in England (ending the careers of anyone older) and groom (that word has developed such negative connotations in this age of internet skulduggery but I'm going to use it anyway) them into experienced internationals in a settled side which will be ready to unleash hell in France and Russia, ending what will by then be 50 years of hurt for Ingerland and their fans.
commentator on England fan issues, the author of Ingerland: Travels with
aussieblue HAVING seen 'Ingerland' play recently, I think Leon Osman, Jags and yes, even 'Chopper' Rodwell are all good enough to play for the Three Lions.
For his role as head of football's governing body, and in the controversy surrounding the 2018 and 2022 World Cup bidding process, Blatter has been compared to Gaddafi and Mussolini, and cast by the tabloids as an evil overlord who shattered the dreams of Ingerland. It is his fault, grown men claim, that Wembley Way's gutters are strewn with the plastic St George hats of the heartbroken.
So, although I have watched every World Cup since 1962, even going so far as to attend the 1966 competition (so gloriously won by "Ingerland"), this year I skipped most of it.
Imagine how the old Ingerland supporters would have behaved in Africa, of all places.
At home, fans who are Ingerland 'til they die, weighed in behind the sceptics, backing Sepp Blatter's plan to restrict foreign players to five in every side.
Germans and Trinidad and Tobago fans mingled with the crowd but it was all good natured banter, as the beer flowed, the barbecues did good business and chants of "Ingerland, Ingerland" filled the air.
The Keep Britain Tidy campaign says that Ingerland has become Eng-urgh-land as councils across the land pay pounds 1.5m a day to clean up the dumped pizzas, burgers, chips and the rest of the mess left in our towns by the World Cup litter louts.