Ingush


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In·gush

 (ĭn′go͞osh, ĭng′-)
n. pl. Ingush or In·gush·es
1. A native or inhabitant of Ingushetia.
2. The Northeast Caucasian language of the Ingush.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ingush

(ɪŋˈɡuːʃ)
n, pl -gushes or -gush
1. (Languages) a member of a people of S central Russia, speaking a Circassian language and chiefly inhabiting the Ingush Republic
2. (Peoples) a member of a people of S central Russia, speaking a Circassian language and chiefly inhabiting the Ingush Republic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
Inguschisch
ingouche
References in periodicals archive ?
(15) Michaela Pohl, "'It Cannot Be That Our Graves Will Be Here': The Survival of Chechen and Ingush Deportees in Kazakhstan, 1944-1957," Journal of Genocide Research 4, 3 (2002): 401-30.
The entire Chechen, Ingush, Kalmyk, Balkar, Karachai, Meskhetian Turk, and Crimean Tatar populations, as well as generations of Russian Poles, Germans, and Koreans, soon found themselves here, unwelcome, considered suspicious individuals or traitors unworthy of the limited available resources, and thus were reduced to a life of wretched conditions (Martin 1998).
Alphabetically listed, they are Bagri, Batak Toba, Bench, Bhili, Capiznon, Chavacano, Eastern Min, Fiji Hindi, Ge'ez, Gurani, Ingush, Karachay, Khorasani Turkic, Kipsigis, Maharashtrian Konkani, Lezgian, Mizo, Maguindanao, Malay (Brunei), Maranao, Southern Min, Northern Sami, Qashqa'i, Rinconada Bikol, Surjapuri, Tausug, Upper Saxon, and Vasavi.
Born in the Chechen capital of Grozny, he creates work that not only revisits the devastation of the recent conflicts, but also traces them back to their roots in the forced migration of the Chechen and Ingush peoples to other parts of the USSR in the 1940s, purportedly the largest and most brutal deportation in Soviet history.
Official sources state 100 Ingush are believed to have entered Syria as militants, with another 175 from the republic of Kabardino-Balkaria.
In the middle of World War II, in February 1943, the Politburo mooted the idea of mass deportation of Chechens and Ingush to Kazakhstan as a punishment for their war crimes, as it was said.
An ardent supporter of missionary activities of the Greco-Russian faith, (21) he wrote to Prince Golitsyn in 1822: "I deported Scottish missionary Blair who lived among the Ingush and behaved suspiciously." The Russian general disapproved of the Edinburgh Missionary Society and pointed out in the same letter: "When educating young men they teach them the language of their fatherland and do not try hard enough to make them good Russian subjects ...
He condemned Stalin for irrationally deporting entire nationality groups (e.g., the Karachay, Kalmyk, Chechen, Ingush, and Balkar peoples) from their homelands during the war and, after the war, for purging major political leaders in Leningrad (1948-50; and in Georgia (1952).
Nizar bin Obaid Madani; and a number of Saudi and Ingush officials.
The armed Chechen and Ingush Islamists who took 777 Ossetian primary-school children hostage in September 2004 would seem a more fitting object for the correspondent's scorn than the authorities who tried to thwart them.