injudicial

injudicial

(ˌɪndʒuːˈdɪʃəl)
adj
1. (Law) not fitting for a judge
2. (Law) not lawful or in line with the form of the law; not judicial
References in periodicals archive ?
States have a unique and legitimate stake injudicial action reviewing the legality of national action within this modern framework.
Moreover, we are not advocating an increase injudicial scrutiny-that is, an approach that is less deferential than hard look review-so much as careful consideration of remedies when courts find blatant disregard of solidly established administrative-law principles.
challenge the necessity and propriety of government actions injudicial
While streamlining eligibility standards, it would still allow judges to grant in forma pauperis status in the absence of public-benefits participation or an arithmetic income calculation by preserving the "substantial hardship" standard that persists injudicial opinions.
injudicial proceedings to be served by mail, electronically, or
Thus, the court's interest injudicial efficiency and
In fiscal year 2018, businesses were ordered to pay more than $10.2 million injudicial fines, forfeitures and restitutions, and another $10.2 million in civil penalties, including a $5.5 million forfeiture by Waste Management of Texas and a $1 million civil fine levied against Oklahoma-based Seaboard Corporation.
Defendants injudicial processes or employees in organizations will pursue self-interested goals, and decisions by the judge or jury or by their employer may conflict with those goals.
redress racial disparities injudicial processing and imprisonment.
2007) (explaining that impeachment is rarely used in the state and federal systems and, even then, is normally reserved for situations where a judge is accused of a crime or the improper use of the judicial office rather than an alleged error injudicial adjudication); Impeachments of Federal Judges, Fed.
As my examples show, to achieve something like dynamic diversity in our free expression culture will require more than a change injudicial attitude or doctrine.
If the Ten Commandments are of such legal and historical significance that courts frequently cite them as legal authority injudicial opinions, they certainly are of such legal and historical significance that they may be displayed in front of the halls of government.