venom

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ven·om

 (vĕn′əm)
n.
1. A poisonous secretion of an animal, such as a snake, spider, or scorpion, usually transmitted to prey or to attackers by a bite or sting.
2. Malice; spite: "They dislike making their just criticism of a useful and earnest man an excuse for a general discharge of venom from small-minded opponents" (W.E.B. Du Bois).

[Middle English venim, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *venīmen, from Latin venēnum, poison; see wen- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

venom

(ˈvɛnəm)
n
1. (Biochemistry) a poisonous fluid secreted by such animals as certain snakes and scorpions and usually transmitted by a bite or sting
2. malice; spite
[C13: from Old French venim, from Latin venēnum poison, love potion; related to venus sexual love]
ˈvenomless adj
ˈvenomous adj
ˈvenomously adv
ˈvenomousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ven•om

(ˈvɛn əm)

n.
1. the poisonous fluid that some animals, as certain snakes and spiders, secrete and introduce into the bodies of their victims by biting, stinging, etc.
2. something suggesting poison in its effect, as malice or jealousy.
3. Archaic. poison in general.
[1175–1225; < Old French venim, venin « Latin venēnum magical potion, poison]
syn: See poison.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ven·om

(vĕn′əm)
A poisonous substance that is secreted by certain snakes, spiders, scorpions, and insects. It can be transmitted to a victim by a bite or sting.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

venom

- Comes from Latin venenum, the love potion Venus used to attract people to each other—but later came to describe "poison."
See also related terms for poison.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.venom - toxin secreted by animalsvenom - toxin secreted by animals; secreted by certain snakes and poisonous insects (e.g., spiders and scorpions)
animal toxin, zootoxin - a toxin resembling bacterial toxins in its antigenic properties that is found in the fluids of certain animals
kokoi venom - a potent neurotoxin found in a particular frog
snake venom - venom secreted by certain snakes
2.venom - feeling a need to see others suffervenom - feeling a need to see others suffer
malevolence, malignity - wishing evil to others
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

venom

noun
2. poison, toxin, bane snake handlers who grow immune to snake venom
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

venom

noun
Anything that is injurious, destructive, or fatal:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
حِقْد، ضَغينَهسُم الأفْعىسُمّ
jedjedovatostjízlivostzlost
giftgiftighedondskabsfuldhed
myrkky
otrov
méreg
eiturillgirni
悪意
독액
su įtūžiu
indeļaunumsniknums
venin
strup
gift
ความรู้สึกโกรธและขมขื่น
sự căm ghét

venom

[ˈvenəm] N (lit) → veneno m (fig) → veneno m, malicia f
he spoke with real venomhabló con veneno or malicia, habló con palabras envenenadas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

venom

[ˈvɛnəm] n
[snake, spider] → venin m
(fig) (in voice, look)venin m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

venom

n (lit)Gift nt; (fig)Bosheit f, → Gehässigkeit f; he spoke with real venom in his voiceer sprach mit hasserfüllter Stimme; a book review full of venomein giftiger Verriss eines Buches; she spat her venom at himsie giftete ihn wütend an; his pen, dipped in venomseine giftige Feder
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

venom

[ˈvɛnəm] n (also) (fig) → veleno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

venom

(ˈvenəm) noun
1. the poison produced by some snakes, scorpions etc, transmitted by biting or stinging. the venom of a cobra.
2. great ill-feeling, anger etc. He spoke with venom.
ˈvenomous adjective
1. (of snakes etc) poisonous. venomous reptiles.
2. (of people, their words etc) full of ill-feeling. a venomous speech.
ˈvenomously adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

venom

سُمّ jízlivost gift Gehässigkeit φαρμάκι ponzoña myrkky venin otrov veleno 悪意 독액 vergift gift jad veneno яд gift ความรู้สึกโกรธและขมขื่น zehir sự căm ghét 毒液
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

ven·om

n. veneno, sustancia tóxica.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

venom

n veneno
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
But it was recently reported that there are currently (http://khn.org/news/insect-venom-shortage-stings-allergy-sufferers-this-summer/) shortages of the insect venoms , partly due to contamination issues, and doctors might have to limit their treatment only to patients who need it the most.
Based on studies evaluating the cross-reactivity of insect venoms, it can be assumed that closely related species would likely pose a greater threat to an individual with previous sting exposures during one's lifetime (18,19); thus, insect venom hypersensitivity in service members should be closely and continuously monitored.