machine language

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machine language

n.
A set of instructions for a specific central processing unit, designed to be usable by a computer without being translated. Also called machine code.

machine′ lan`guage



n.
a usu. numerical coding system specific to the hardware of a given computer model, into which any high-level or assembly program must be translated before being run.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.machine language - a programming language designed for use on a specific class of computersmachine language - a programming language designed for use on a specific class of computers
programing language, programming language - (computer science) a language designed for programming computers
2.machine language - a set of instructions coded so that the computer can use it directly without further translationmachine language - a set of instructions coded so that the computer can use it directly without further translation
computer code, code - (computer science) the symbolic arrangement of data or instructions in a computer program or the set of such instructions
Translations
машинен език
llenguatge de màquina
strojový kód
maskinkode
maŝinkodo
masinkood
konekieli
שפת מכונה
मशीनी भाषा
strojni jezik
gépi kódgépi nyelv
bahasa mesin
vélamál
codice macchinalinguaggio macchina
マシン語機械語
mašininis kodas
യന്ത്രതല ഭാഷ
machinetaal
maskinkode
język maszynowy
código de máquina
strojový kód
strojna koda
maskinkod
makine dili
машинний код
ngôn ngữ máy

machine language

n (Comput) → linguaggio m macchina inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Most single-word instructions are executed in a single instruction cycle, unless a conditional test is true or the program counter is changed as a result of the instruction.
In fact, assigning a grade to the student's work is actually a fifth step in the instruction cycle.
Using only 2 clocks per instruction cycle, the M8051E-Warp achieves six times the performance of a standard 8051 core at the same power consumption, while maintaining full functional compatibility with legacy devices.
Satisfied that the 801 concepts had made significant improvements in instruction cycle times and pipeline efficiency, IBM set out to improve further on the 801 architecture by: 1) explicitly embodying the concept of superscalar operation in the architecture; 2) improving the architecture as a target for compilers; 3) reducing instruction path lengths; and 4) including floating point as a first-class data type in the architecture.
On the second day of each instruction cycle, the students recorded text-identified vocabulary and timelines in their notebooks.