insulin resistance

(redirected from Insulin sensitivity)
Also found in: Medical.

insulin resistance

n.
Impaired ability of an organism or of its cells or tissues to respond effectively to insulin, as in type 2 diabetes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arslanian's research strategy is to recruit black and white children, match them on the basis of various demographic and physiologic factors, and admit them overnight to the children's research center one or more times for measurement of insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and other factors.
Arslanian of the University of Pittsburgh and her colleagues have demonstrated that black children have lower insulin sensitivity and higher insulin secretion than their white peers.
Insoluble fiber, such as in wholegrain breads and cereals, can improve insulin sensitivity.
2] is thought to be involved in maintaining normal insulin sensitivity and to be beneficial for [beta]-cell function (Livingstone and Collison 2002; Louet et al.
SAN DIEGO -- Moderate exercise equivalent to a brisk 1-hour walk 4 days a week improved insulin sensitivity in a group of women with polycystic ovary syndrome, even in the absence of weight loss, results from a small trial suggest.
Not surprisingly, the men who were lean and had normal insulin sensitivity burned fat more efficiently than did those who were overweight and insulin resistant.
A statistically significant increase in insulin sensitivity was observed in patients who underwent blood letting [3 extractions of 450 g (500 mL of blood) during a 4-month period] (7).
Ideally, insulin sensitivity should be high to reduce the risk of diabetes, hardening of the arteries, high blood pressure, and other conditions.
They're much leaner, have lower levels of circulating glucose and insulin, and have greater insulin sensitivity.
People who sleep an average of only five hours a night have a lower insulin sensitivity than those who sleep for eight.
Professor Active Emeritus at Stanford University and Shaman Senior Vice President of Clinical Affairs, "that shows that efforts to maintain insulin sensitivity and low insulin levels might well be helpful in lowering risk of certain kinds of cancer.
Our Quantose IR test also provides a useful therapeutic monitoring tool to complement traditional markers in gauging treatment effectiveness due to its non-glycemic markers tracking so closely with changing insulin sensitivity.

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