intercession

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Related to Intercessory prayer: Prayer Warrior

in·ter·ces·sion

 (ĭn′tər-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. Entreaty in favor of another, especially a prayer or petition to God in behalf of another.
2. Mediation in a dispute.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin intercessiō, intercessiōn-, intervention, from intercessus, past participle of intercēdere, to intervene; see intercede.]

in′ter·ces′sion·al adj.

intercession

(ˌɪntəˈsɛʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of interceding
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the act of interceding or offering petitionary prayer to God on behalf of others
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) such petitionary prayer
4. (Historical Terms) Roman history the interposing of a veto by a tribune or other magistrate
[C16: from Latin intercessio; see intercede]
ˌinterˈcessional, ˌinterˈcessory adj
ˌinterˈcessor n
ˌintercesˈsorial adj

in•ter•ces•sion

(ˌɪn tərˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. an act or instance of interceding.
2. an interposing or pleading on behalf of another person.
3. a prayer to God on behalf of another.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin intercessiō=intercēd(ere) to intercede + -tiō -tion]
in`ter•ces′sion•al, adj.
in`ter•ces′so•ry, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intercession - a prayer to God on behalf of another personintercession - a prayer to God on behalf of another person
orison, petition, prayer - reverent petition to a deity
2.intercession - the act of intervening (as to mediate a dispute, etc.); "it occurs without human intervention"
involvement, participation, involution, engagement - the act of sharing in the activities of a group; "the teacher tried to increase his students' engagement in class activities"
intermediation, mediation - the act of intervening for the purpose of bringing about a settlement

intercession

noun pleading, prayer, intervention, plea, mediation, advocacy, solicitation, entreaty, good offices, supplication Many claimed to have been cured as a result of her intercessions.
Translations
وِساطَه، شَفاعَه
přímluva
forbøn
közbenjárás
meîalganga
intervencia
aracılık etmeşefaat

intercession

[ˌɪntəˈseʃən] Nintercesión f, mediación f

intercession

[ˌɪntərˈsɛʃən] nintercession f

intercession

nFürsprache f; (in argument) → Vermittlung f

intercession

[ˌɪntəˈsɛʃn] nintercessione f

intercede

(intəˈsiːd) verb
1. to try to put an end to a fight, argument etc between two people, countries etc. All attempts to intercede between the two nations failed.
2. to try to persuade someone not to do something to someone else. The condemned murderer's family interceded (with the President) on his behalf.
ˌinterˈcession (-ˈseʃən) noun
References in periodicals archive ?
The "Study of the Therapeutic Effects of Intercessory Prayer in Cardiac Bypass Patients" by Herbert Benson and Jeffery Dusek tested the effects of intercessory prayer on the outcome complications of CABG patients.
The sacraments further lead the church to become a missional body for witness and proclamation, as well as intercessory prayers for the justice, reconciliation, healing, and peace of the world.
Also, the intervention (intercessory prayer) only includes the IP provided by the intercessors, not the effect or result of communication with God.
[...] Thus, we again conclude that scientists interested in the effects of prayer on health should turn their attention away from studies of distant intercessory prayer and instead should focus on those areas where the effects of prayer may be conceptualized in terms of naturally occurring mechanisms that are within the domain of study of several branches of science, including psychology, biology, physiology, and medicine [...]."
The range of topics covered is prodigious, starting with 'Intercessory Prayer Clauses in Christian Letters', an interesting look at the role of cliches, specifically the phrase ora pro me in letters from late antiquity to the early Middle Ages.
She further decorates the Rosary with prayers, including The Memorare before the Apostles Creed, an excellent addition for intercessory prayer, and the St.
(4) Data shows a range of findings about the efficacy of intercessory prayer (5-7) and distant healing.
Author John Brenner Chandler has served in various aspects of ministry for assorted denominational and non-denominational churches for over thirty years, including intercessory prayer ministry and teaching Sunday School.
She quickly and efficiently lays out monastic vision stories and broader practices such as intercessory prayer, prayer for the dead, sacramental baptism and penance, and funeral practices and epitaphs to establish two centuries of "incremental steps" linking purgation in the afterlife and prayer for the savable soul.
As with the God concept, statistically significant evidence for the efficacy of intercessory prayer is severely lacking (no God, no agency, no reason to continue paying attention).
Candy Gunther Brown, an associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University Bloomington, led the study of 'proximal intercessory prayer' for healing.
When comparing this data to data of the most readily used prayer form for faculty prayer, polarized results are noted: Many respondents find faith sharing, intercessory prayer, and Gospel reflection meaningful to them, yet these forms occur far less often in schools than using resource books/devotionals for leading prayer and praying a traditional prayer like the Our Father (see Table 5).