intercostal

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in·ter·cos·tal

 (ĭn′tər-kŏs′təl)
adj.
Located or occurring between the ribs.
n.
A space, muscle, or part situated between the ribs.

[New Latin intercostālis : inter- + Latin costa, rib; see kost- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

intercostal

(ˌɪntəˈkɒstəl)
adj
(Anatomy) anatomy between the ribs: intercostal muscles.
[C16: via New Latin from Latin inter- + costa rib]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ter•cos•tal

(ˌɪn tərˈkɒs tl, -ˈkɔ stl)

adj.
1. situated between the ribs.
n.
2. an intercostal muscle or part.
[1590–1600; < New Latin intercostālis. See inter-, costal]
in`ter•cos′tal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intercostal - muscles between the ribsintercostal - muscles between the ribs; they contract during inspiration
skeletal muscle, striated muscle - a muscle that is connected at either or both ends to a bone and so move parts of the skeleton; a muscle that is characterized by transverse stripes
Adj.1.intercostal - located or occurring between the ribs; "intercostal muscles"
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

intercostal

[ˌɪntəˈkɒstl] ADJintercostal
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

intercostal

[ˌɪntəˈkɒstl] adj (Anat) → intercostale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

in·ter·cos·tal

a. intercostal, entre dos costillas;
___ membranesmembranas ___ -es;
___ nervesnervios ___ -es;
___ spaceespacio ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

intercostal

adj intercostal
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Agonist intercostals in the parasternal region and lower external intercostals also have a large inspiratory mechanical advantage [3-4], and they contract in a predictable manner at rest [1,5].
It has been noted that the inspiratory intercostals appear to remodel with chronic changes in motor demands.
We hypothesized that respiratory loads generated during ITTO would result in significant hypertrophy and myogenic activity in the parasternal intercostals when compared with a surgical control group.
These same animals were studied in an earlier acute investigation whose main aim was to develop a surgical technique to implant intramuscular electrodes provided with self-securing polypropylene anchors in the upper intercostals and abdominal-wall muscles [20].
([dagger]) Significant difference between diaphragm stimulation alone and simultaneous diaphragm and upper-thorax intercostals muscle stimulation (p = 0.05).
The main muscles of inspiration are the diaphragm, external intercostal muscles, and accessory muscles of the shoulder and the upper back.
Case 2: After accidental penetration by a iron rod, there was leakage of ruminal contents from 6th intercostal space.
Case 2: Longitudinal incision was given at 6th intercostal space and extended along fistulous tract upto 10th rib.
Flank bulge has never been reported following PCNL; however, flank bulge is a known potential complication of flank incisions for various retroperitoneal surgical procedures and has been reported in the urological,[sup.12] vascular[sup.13] and neurosurgical literature.[sup.14,15] Flank bulge due to laxity of the anterolateral abdominal musculature may be caused by damage to intercostal nerves.[sup.14] In a cadaveric and electrophysiological study, Fahim and colleagues showed that the most significant intercostal nerve contributions to the anterolateral wall came from the T11 and T12 nerves.[sup.14] They concluded that postoperative flank bulge was likely due to denervation of the abdominal musculature from injury to the T11 and T12 intercostal nerves.
McAllister and colleagues characterized key anatomical relationships relevant to PCNL through anatomical dissection of the 11[sup.th] intercostal space.[sup.10] They recorded the distance of the intercostal neurovascular structures from the 11[sup.th] rib at 3 sites: lateral border of the paraspinous muscle, the mid-scapular line and the posterior axillary line.
Zhang commonly reroutes one of the intercostal nerves that lead from the spinal cord around each rib to the sternum.
If the injury site is above the thoracic area where the intercostal nerves originate, other peripheral nerves can be selected.