internationalist

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in·ter·na·tion·al·ism

 (ĭn′tər-năsh′ə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The condition or quality of being international in character, principles, concern, or attitude.
2. A policy or practice of cooperation among nations, especially in politics and economic matters.

in′ter·na′tion·al·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

internationalist

(ˌɪntəˈnæʃənəlɪst)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an advocate of internationalism
2. (Law) a person versed in international law
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (capital) a member of an International
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ter•na•tion•al•ist

(ˌɪn tərˈnæʃ ə nl ɪst)

n.
1. an advocate of internationalism.
2. an expert in international law and relations.
3. (cap.) a member or adherent of a communist or socialist International.
[1860]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.internationalist - an advocate of internationalism
advocate, advocator, exponent, proponent - a person who pleads for a cause or propounds an idea
2.internationalist - a member of a socialist or communist international
International - any of several international socialist organizations
socialist - a political advocate of socialism
Adj.1.internationalist - influenced by or advocating internationalism
international - concerning or belonging to all or at least two or more nations; "international affairs"; "an international agreement"; "international waters"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

internationalist

[ˌɪntəˈnæʃnəlɪst]
B. Ninternacionalista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

internationalist

[ˌɪntərˈnæʃənəlɪSt]
adj [belief, opinion] → internationaliste
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

internationalist

nInternationalist(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
"Traditional Internationalists" (18%) focused on the U.S.'s duty to engage in world affairs, the benefits of trade and alliances, the importance of defending democratic values, and the obligation to use force in response to threats.
Liberal internationalists tend to be more interventionist abroad, believing that American power should be used to promote democracy, freedom and human rights.
Pan American Women: US Internationalists and Revolutionary Mexico
Surprisingly, because he is an academic, he ignores the historical contributions of my study; and not so surprisingly, because he is a realist, he objects to the conservative and liberal internationalists' "shared dream of a world led by the United States toward ever more political and economic liberalism."
PHD, a global media and communications network, received seven awards at the Internationalists Awards for Innovation in Media held in New York.
Two groups, pacifists and liberal internationalists, stated their concerns over diplomacy as it was practiced by European countries as World War I began.
Mazower credits it with the early internationalists' concern for the protection of ethnic and cultural minorities, which the British Empire/Commonwealth in its latter days used to trot out as one of its justifications, the idea being that only a supranational authority could prevent nations persecuting their minorities, which is arguable.
The debate between realists and liberal internationalists leaves no explanation for Ronald Reagan's eclectic foreign policy choices and the extraordinary outcomes he achieved.
Berman's much more luminous essay describes how graduates of the 1968 left also moved toward the center, turning into liberal internationalists who came to accept that military power might be necessary in certain cases.
internationalists at a highly secret September 12-14 gathering of U.S., Canadian, and Mexican heavyweights.
What does make Coughlin's book important, however, is that it highlights the inability of (mostly conservative) commentators to differentiate between liberal internationalists like Blair and the neoconservatives who led the charge for war in America.
liberal conservative internationalists (Andrew Carnegie, Elihu Root, Teddy Roosevelt, and Woodrow Wilson) used an idea of justice to legitimize "accumulation by dispossession" and America's use of the World War I to renew the imperial project as war to "make the world safe for democracy." It looks at how a similar attempt is being made today by George W.