interpreted language

(redirected from Interpretive language)
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in·ter·pret·ed language

 (ĭn-tûr′prĭ-tĭd)
n. Computers
A programming language whose programs are typically executed by an interpreter.
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129) Interpretive language can be inserted into provisions to clarify ambiguous terms of art; traditional provisions can be expanded to provide additional protections for human rights and policy space; additional provisions can be added which explicitly protect governmental policy space; and, most controversially, positive obligations can be inserted into BITs which place direct responsibilities on corporations and states to protect human rights.
The performance's description is intriguing, a deep look into people's relationships through the interpretive language of modern dance.
The American Coatings Association (ACA) has secured interpretive language from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) stating that its rule for Consumer Products, which regulates paint thinners and solvents, does not include thinners used specifically in marine and automotive refinish coatings.
The facility's commitment to safety along with other remarkable interpretive language is found in the regulatory overview portion of F323.
Ticketing, feeding, and museum shop mammon have all been relegated to a wing on the margins; as at Dia's Chelsea space, gallery signage will be spare, with interpretive language out of sight in take-one brochures.
This search for interpretive language parallels the efforts of theologians to understand the Christ event -- and indeed much of what the church devises in the early centuries is nothing less than metaphor.
Also, at this moment in history, psychology offers an interpretive language critics and general readers are likely to share, even if it hasn't been applied extensively to architecture in the past.

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