Intraterritorial

In`tra`ter`ri`to´ri`al


a.1.Within the territory or a territory.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
978, 1010 n.150 (2011); see also ZICK, supra note 4, at 187 (noting that the Supreme Court in Humanitarian Law Project "posits a foreign-domestic distinction with respect to First Amendment freedoms that suggests full constitutional protection applies only to intraterritorial communications and associations"); Cole, supra note 16, at 164 ("There is certainly reason to believe that the analysis in Humanitarian Law Project is not generally applicable.").
Complementariamente, en aquellas regiones europeas menos ricas seria donde se debieran concentrar, por un lado, los mayores esfuerzos de una creciente union fiscal en las dimensiones educativas y de una minima garantia de rentas, al tiempo que, por otro, la mejora de la dimension de salud debiera descansar en un refuerzo de la solidaridad intraterritorial de cada pais.
(100) Shoichi Tagashira, IntraTerritorial Effects of Foreign Insolvency of Proceedings: An Analysis of "Ancillary" Proceedings in the United States and Japan, 29 Tex.
had occupied territories for military, strategic, and commercial purposes both inside (intraterritorial) and outside (extraterritorial) its boundaries (Raustiala 2009).
estate, and other matters immovable and intraterritorial in their nature
(21) Erie argued that its common law duty of care fell into the category in Swift called local--that is, it concerned things "immovable and intraterritorial in their nature and character." (22) Tompkins argued that Erie's duty of care was general, which meant that a federal court was free to come to its own conclusion about what the common law was.