coagulation

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Related to Intrinsic pathway: Extrinsic pathway

co·ag·u·late

 (kō-ăg′yə-lāt′)
v. co·ag·u·lat·ed, co·ag·u·lat·ing, co·ag·u·lates
v.tr.
To cause transformation of (a liquid or sol, for example) into or as if into a soft, semisolid, or solid mass.
v.intr.
To become coagulated: As it cooled, the sauce began to coagulate.

[Middle English coagulaten, from Latin coāgulāre, coāgulāt-, from coāgulum, coagulator; see coagulum.]

co·ag′u·la·bil′i·ty n.
co·ag′u·la·ble, co·ag′u·la′tive (-lā′tĭv, -lə-tĭv) adj.
co·ag′u·la′tion n.
co·ag′u·la′tor n.

coagulation

1. The grouping together of small particles in a solution into larger particles. Such a solution eventually coagulates with the particles forming either a precipitate or a gel.
2. blood clotting
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coagulation - the process of forming semisolid lumps in a liquid
blood clotting, blood coagulation - a process in which liquid blood is changed into a semisolid mass (a blood clot)
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
thermocoagulation - congealing tissue by heat (as by electric current)
Translations

coagulation

[kəʊˌægjʊˈleɪʃən] Ncoagulación f

coagulation

[kəʊˌægjʊˈleɪʃən] ncoagulation f

coagulation

n (of blood)Gerinnen nt, → Gerinnung f, → Koagulation f (spec); (of milk)Dickwerden nt; (of jelly)Festwerden nt; (of paint)Eindicken nt

coagulation

[kəʊˌægjʊˈleɪʃn] ncoagulazione f

co·ag·u·la·tion

n. coagulación, coágulo; cambio en la sangre de estado líquido a solido;
disseminated intravascular ______ intravascular diseminada;
___ factorfactor de ___.

coagulation

n coagulación f; disseminated intravascular — (DIC) coagulación intravascular diseminada
References in periodicals archive ?
The intrinsic pathway takes place in mitochondria; it starts with the activation of a cell cycle regulator gene, p53 tumour suppressor gene as well as through members of B cell lymphoma 2 family.3 Upregulation of p53 activates proapoptotic members of Bcl2 family, namely Bcl2 associated x protein (Bax) and Bcl2 antagonist killer (Bak) which forms holes in the mitochondrial membrane and leads to the release of cytochrome c and finally apoptosis.4 The extrinsic mechanism includes cell death via activation of cell surface transmembrane death receptors.
As an example, BCL-2 family proteins control the intrinsic pathway on the antiapoptotic side; however, BAX and BAK proteins are promoters of cell death.
According to studies, the intrinsic pathway of coagulation also has contributions to thrombogenicity.
Through MOAP-1, RASSF1A activates Bcl-2 family proteins, including Bax and consequently intrinsic pathway of apoptosis.
Two different pathways generally mediate Apoptosis: intrinsic pathway and extrinsic cell death pathway.
A Small molecule that induces intrinsic pathway apoptosis with unparalleled speed.
An isolated aPTT prolongation suggests a deficiency or inhibitor of one or more of the intrinsic pathway clotting factors including prekallikrein, high-molecular-weight kininogen, and factors XII, XI, IX, and VIII.
This intrinsic pathway of increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may lead to structural abnormalities and functional breakdown in this organelle.
All these results indicated that BMSCs could protect NPCs from compression-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the mitochondrial or intrinsic pathway.
The involvement of the intrinsic pathway on CAP-induced apoptosis was verified through the analysis of Bax and Bcl-2 expression.