Inupiaq

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I·nu·pi·aq

 (ĭ-no͞o′pē-ăk′, -äk′, -nyo͞o′-)
n. pl. Inupiaq or I·nu·pi·aqs or I·nu·pi·at (-ăt′, -ät′) or I·nu·pi·ats
1. A member of a group of Eskimoan peoples inhabiting the northwest and northern coastal areas of Alaska.
2. The language of the Inupiaq. See Usage Notes at Eskimo, Inuit.

[Inupiaq iñupiaq, original person : iñuk, person + -pia-, real + -q, sing. suff.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

I•nu•pi•aq

or I•nu•pi•ak

(ɪˈnu piˌæk, ɪˈnyu-)

n., pl. -pi•at (-piˌæt)
1. a member of any of several Eskimo groups inhabiting NW and N Alaska, including the North Slope.
2. the group of Inuit dialects spoken by the Inupiat.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
Inupiak
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hiring the right people was key-people you could trust and people who had the Inupiaqs in mind.
As for the Inupiaq people, I hope we continue to educate our younger generations and prepare them for this world that is becoming more complicated and challenging.
Ces cent dernieres annees, la facon dont les villages inupiaqs, en Alaska, se sont procure l'eau douce necessaire a la consommation et a d'autres usages humains a change considerablement.
Over the last 100 years, there have been major changes in the way Inupiaq villages in Alaska have procured fresh water for drinking and other human uses.
Key words: freshwater, centralized water systems, water technology, Alaska, Inupiaq, localization, technoscape, globalization, adaptation
Mots cles: eau douce, reseaux centralises d'alimentation en eau, technologic de l'eau, Alaska, Inupiaq, localisation, techno-paysage, mondialisation, adaptation
Nine additional journalists selected as associate fellows proposed projects ranging from a training program for Inupiaqs in Alaska to a series of editorials about community colleges and workforce preparation, technical education and teacher quality.
But the efforts I have seen while living with the Yup'iks and Inupiaqs is that the old ways will not "go gently into that good night."
There are several days set aside each school year at both schools called Inupiaq Days.
Not only are those types of cultural endeavors kept high on the list or priorities by the community leaders, each school has signs hung in strategic areas listing the Inupiaq values: Faith, hope, and love.
My Name is Not Easy by Debby Dahl Edwardson is a fictionalized version of her Inupiaq husband's residential school experience at Sacred Heart School, situated far from his actual village home.
Not only are those type of cultural endeavors kept high on the list or priorities by the community leaders, each school has signs hung in strategic areas listing the Inupiaq values: faith, hope, and love.