Prague Spring

(redirected from Invasion of Czechoslovakia)
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Prague Spring

1968–69 An attempt to present “socialism with a human face” in Czechoslovakia as initiated by Dubcek. It was suppressed by Soviet invasion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shortly after the invasion of Czechoslovakia on March 15 Poland formed a military alliance with the UK in a bid to prevent that country being next to fall.
The Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia took place Aug.
Then came the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, at a time when the world was witnessing further escalation in devastating war and invasion culminating in America's war in Vietnam and the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, both in 1968.
nevertheless criticized Moscow for its invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968 and, during the heyday of Eurocommunism in the 1970s, even for its domestic policies.
The Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968 had first revealed the deep rift dividing Moscow and Beijing as they now faced off aggressively in Central Asia.
We got caught up in the Russian invasion of Czechoslovakia but still had a great time on what was our first trip outside the UK.
At the Q n A, he said that the invasion of Czechoslovakia happened because no one prevented Adolf Hitler from seizing territories.
Sweden also criticized (perhaps more than any other European state) the Soviet Union for its invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968.
He said: "This is the most serious crisis to have faced Europe, arguably, since the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968.
Necas had escaped from Nazi imprisonment in his home country and fled, along with other ministers, to set up a government in exile in London after the German invasion of Czechoslovakia.
For example, the chapter on foreign policy shows a welcome subtlety and balance on a topic often subjected to stereotypical interpretations, as ever delivering little gems of analysis and observation: on Cuban "internationalism" (owing more to nationalism than "proletarian solidarity"), on Castro's complex motivations for supporting the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, on the peculiar tortuous relationship with Spain, and on the complex relationship with Moscow, Cuba acting less as a satellite than as a "junior partner.
But what we did off-field in football could also make us proud, like Celtic following up their victory in the European Cup in 1967 with a principled stance in 1968, refusing to play Ferencvaros after the Hungarian government had been a complicit partner in the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia days earlier.