Prague Spring

(redirected from Invasion of Czechoslovakia)
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Prague Spring

1968–69 An attempt to present “socialism with a human face” in Czechoslovakia as initiated by Dubcek. It was suppressed by Soviet invasion.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
But in 1968, after the invasion of Czechoslovakia .
Third place went to Slovakia joining the European Union in 2004, Zora Buacutetorovaacute from the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO) told TASR.Both the Slovak and the Czech public deemed the 1968 Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia the darkest moment in their shared history.
Invasion of Czechoslovakia, 1968: Russia loads nuclear bombs into aircraft ready to support invading troops.
operative, and remained a faithful hireling of the Kremlin until the invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968.
In 1973, after years-long quarreling, she left the party because of the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia. The American Communist Party had remained blindly pro-Soviet on this, as on every other issue.
After Che Guevara's death in Bolivia, the screenwriter Jiri Mucha wrote, "Without men like Che, there would be no more hope left." Castro supported Alexander Dubcek on the principle of independence, if not on matters of substance, and swallowed the 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia as a bitter medicine.
Counseling Presidents of the future, he says at one point, "Do not go to an unprepared 'quickie' summit meeting," adding"at the quickie summit in Glassboro in 1968, Johnson achieved nothing, except to help the world forget the recent brutal Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia."
These lines of defense became rather muted in the period after the invasion of Czechoslovakia. I heard Castro deliver the rationalizations for that invasion when I was in Havana twenty years ago.
His presence on the Communists' lists does not denote his return to the party, but it does give a kind of imprimatur to the P.C.I.'s commitment to democracy and to the independent political line it has taken since the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968.
This was the case for University of Dundee graduate Drahuna Dutton who was visiting friends in Bristol in August 1968 when the Soviet Union led Warsaw Pact troops in an invasion of Czechoslovakia.
|The Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline and the latest initiative concerning the August 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia by the Warsaw Pact armies were among the topics discussed by Russian President Vladimir Putin and Slovak Prime Minister Peter Pellegrini on the second day of the latter's visit to Russia.The two met in the Constantine Palace in Saint Petersburg.
In 1968, she went on her "OE" and got caught up in the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia. On her return, she was restless, put a pin in a map and came to New Zealand.