whole language

(redirected from Invented spelling)

whole language

n.
A method of teaching people to read by emphasizing the recognition of words in everyday contexts and the use of books that are not textbooks.

whole′-lan′guage adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
accepts invented spelling, or her students would never put pencil to paper.
LNK has also been found to be important to early encoding processes developed through invented spelling instruction [25-29].
Rieben, Ntamakiliro, Gonthier, & Fayol (2005), assigned 145 five-year old children to four treatment groups: invented spelling (children wrote their own spellings for a dictated word), copied spelling (copied words from a model), invented spelling with feedback on correct spelling (children produced their own spellings followed by feedback on how the words were actually spelled, along with comments on the orthographic characteristics they missed), and a control group that made drawings of words.
Emergent writing with its invented spelling reflects children's growing understanding of the underlying relationships between letters and sounds.
Stahl, Duffy-Hester & Stahl (2006) emphasise the importance of this invented spelling stage in developing phonemic awareness.
I still remember having a discussion with my literacy professor about the idea of "invented spelling" and how I found it extremely confusing.
Researchers scored the spellings to allow partial credit for invented spelling, which made the test more sensitive to differences and less susceptible to floor effects, which is important for poor spellers and potentially for students with reading disabilities.
* Alphabetic code (alphabet knowledge, phonological/phonemic awareness, invented spelling)
They ploughed on, expanding into software like Office with Word (where they invented spelling) Excel (where they invented hard sums) and Powerpoint, (where they invented boring meetings).
Alphabetic code: alphabet knowledge, phonological/phonemic awareness, invented spelling
As children begin to spell, they typically engage in "invented spelling" (Lombardino et al., 1997, p.