eminent domain

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eminent domain

n.
The power of a government to take private property for public use without the owner's consent, provided just compensation is given.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

eminent domain

n
(Law) law the right of a state to confiscate private property for public use, payment usually being made to the owners in compensation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

em′inent domain′


n.
the power of the state to take private property for public use with payment of compensation to the owner.
[1730–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eminent domain - the right of the state to take private property for public use; the Fifth Amendment that was added to the Constitution of the United States requires that just compensation be made
legal right - a right based in law
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the legislation does not address the state's inverse condemnation law, which PG&E blames for its bankruptcy.
Gavin Newsom recommended that the state make changes to its inverse condemnation and strict liability doctrines that hold utilities responsible for disasters arising from their equipment, even in the absence of a finding of negligence.
Several of the committee members also serve as mediators in eminent domain and inverse condemnation cases.
The Force will evaluate a liquidity-only fund/securitization, changes to inverse condemnation, and a catastrophic wildfire fund, adds the analyst.
One potential solution would be to change laws that California courts have interpreted to assign strict liability to investor-owned utilities inverse condemnation actions, which are lawsuits against public entities.
They allege that a 2004 policy change to protect wildlife, known as the Missouri River Recovery Program, amounted to an inverse condemnation of low-lying farmland which previously had been protected against flooding by the Corps.
Kelly also assists his real estate clients in the areas of eminent domain, inverse condemnation, Bert J.
The rating action reflects the enormous increase in the size, intensity and destructive power of wildfires in California during 2017-2018, the implications of potential, vastly increased third-party liabilities under inverse condemnation and uncertainties regarding full and timely recovery of such costs.
The lube shop sued based on inverse condemnation, contending the unrepaired sinkhole amounted to a government "taking" of its property right to have accessible customer access.
The Owner initiated an inverse condemnation action against the City, alleging that its constitutionally protected property rights were taken without compensation.

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