inverse-square law

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in·verse-square law

(ĭn′vûrs-skwâr′)
n.
The principle in physics that the effect of certain forces, such as light, sound, and gravity, on an object varies by the inverse square of the distance between the object and the source of the force. For example, an object placed three feet away from a light source will receive only one ninth ( 1/32 , the inverse of 3 squared) as much illumination as an object placed one foot from the light.

inverse-square law

A principle in physics dealing with forces that spread equally in all directions (such as sound, light, and gravity) and describing how the strength of these forces weakens over increasing distance. According to this principle, the effect of the force on an object changes by the inverse square of the distance between the object and the force's source. For example, an object placed three feet away from a light source will receive only one-ninth (1/32, the inverse of 3 squared) as much illumination as an object placed one foot from the light.
References in periodicals archive ?
If two stars have the same absolute brightness, but one is twice as far away, it appears one-fourth as bright as the nearby one--a relationship known as the inverse-square law.
Early on, Isaac Newton (1642-1727) developed his laws of motion and inferred the inverse-square law of gravitational attraction.
Change of SL with distance from the source is explained by the inverse-square law.
Consequently, the practicable version for Rindler's Lorentz force law becomes the same as a time-retarded version for Newton's well-known inverse-square law
In 1750, John Michel theorized that permanent magnet has north and south poles that attract or repel each other according to an inverse-square law that is similar to Coulomb's law of force.
Moreover the explanation of Hooke's theory of gravitational force and distance--another major controversy with Newton--confuses an inverse with an inverse-square relationship.
When using flash outdoors for any of the techniques described here, it pays to remember the inverse-square law.
For example, the observed behavior of the Earth revolving around the sun can be perfectly explained if the sun has a net positive charge and the planets have a net negative charge, since opposite charges attract and the force is an inverse-square law, exactly like the increasingly discredited theory of gravity.
Hooke is known as the man who dared challenge Newton as discoverer of the inverse-square law of gravitational attraction.
If Hooke is remembered at all, it's for actions during his prime years, when he became a controversial figure for publicly claiming credit for Isaac Newton's inverse-square law of gravity.
While developing a 16-week college course on maintenance management in 2001, three significant new discoveries were made concerning the financial management of maintenance, and rules were created to cover them: the Inverse-Square Rule for Deferred Maintenance, the Effects of the Chaos Theory on Budgeting Maintenance, and the Cost to Improve Maintenance.
More recently, in the human social context (Freckleton and Sutherland, 2001), inverse-square relationships were found for self-regulated time series (like the length of waiting lists to see hospital consultants) and for unregulated, random-walk time series, a generalization with applications in forecasting and management.