intervertebral disc

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Related to Invertebral disc: Herniated Intervertebral Disc
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intervertebral disk
profile of lumbar intervertebral disks

intervertebral disk

or intervertebral disc
n.
A broad disk of fibrocartilage situated between adjacent vertebrae of the spinal column.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

intervertebral disc

(ˌɪntəˈvɜːtəbrəl)
n
(Anatomy) any of the cartilaginous discs between individual vertebrae, acting as shock absorbers
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intervertebral disc - a fibrocartilaginous disc serving as a cushion between all of the vertebrae of the spinal column (except between the first two)
spinal column, spine, vertebral column, rachis, backbone, back - the series of vertebrae forming the axis of the skeleton and protecting the spinal cord; "the fall broke his back"
disk, saucer, disc - something with a round shape resembling a flat circular plate; "the moon's disk hung in a cloudless sky"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
meziobratlová ploténka
disco intervertebral
disques intervertébraux
tussenwervelschijf
disco intervertebral
intervertebraldiskmellankotskiva

intervertebral disc

nBandscheibe f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Eisenstein, "Type X collagen in the human invertebral disc: an indication of repair or remodelling?" Histochemical Journal, vol.
University of Manchester scientists have discovered how to permanently replace the workings of the invertebral disc.
When we're born, the invertebral disc is made up of about 80 per cent water, which gives it its sponginess and allows it to function as an efficient shock absorber.