euthanasia

(redirected from Involuntary Euthanasia)
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Related to Involuntary Euthanasia: passive euthanasia, active euthanasia

eu·tha·na·sia

 (yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

[Greek euthanasiā, a good death : eu-, eu- + thanatos, death.]

euthanasia

(ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə) or

euthanasy

n
(Medicine) the act of killing someone painlessly, esp to relieve suffering from an incurable illness. Also called: mercy killing
[C17: via New Latin from Greek: easy death, from eu- + thanatos death]

eu•tha•na•sia

(ˌyu θəˈneɪ ʒə, -ʒi ə, -zi ə)

n.
Also called mercy killing. the act of putting to death painlessly or allowing to die, as by withholding medical measures from a person or animal suffering from an incurable, esp. a painful, disease or condition.
[1640–50; < New Latin < Greek euthanasía easy death]

euthanasia

1. the act of putting to death without pain a person incurably ill or suffering great pain; mercy killing.
2. an easy, painless death. — euthanasic, adj.
See also: Killing
the deliberate killing of painfully ill or terminally ill people to put them out of their misery. Also called mercy killing.
See also: Death
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)
kill, putting to death, killing - the act of terminating a life

euthanasia

noun mercy killing, assisted suicide the emotive question of whether euthanasia should be legalized
Translations
إماتَه رَحيمَه
eutanasimedlidenhedsdrab
eutanázia
líknardráp
eutanazijaneskausmingas numarinimas
eitanāzija
eutanázia
ötenazitatlı ölüm

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] Neutanasia f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪziə] neuthanasie f

euthanasia

nEuthanasie f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] neutanasia

euthanasia

(juːθəˈneiziə) noun
the painless killing of someone who is suffering from a painful and incurable illness. Many old people would prefer euthanasia to the suffering they have to endure.

eu·tha·na·si·a

n. eutanasia, muerte infringida sin sufrimiento en casos de una enfermedad incurable.

euthanasia

n eutanasia
References in periodicals archive ?
Involuntary euthanasia is regarded as a caring response to severe disabilities.
In defense of the scorecard, Elizabeth Graham, the director of Texas Right to Life, said the legislation endorsed by the Catholic bishops "was an expansion of involuntary euthanasia and imposed death.
Involuntary euthanasia is bringing a patient's life to an end against their will.
4) The justifications for this restriction include avoiding the possibility of abuse, preventing the risk of a slippery slope to involuntary euthanasia, or preserving the integrity of the medical profession.
In the case of the euthanasia notion we distinguish three forms: voluntary euthanasia, non-voluntary euthanasia and involuntary euthanasia.
But Latimer merely elevated the public awareness of the problem of involuntary euthanasia and then slipped into the shadows, leaving no vestige of a solution.
Yet, it should be emphatically reiterated that the bottom line for involuntary euthanasia is that the patient's life is terminated for his or her own sake and nothing else, however, it is also worth noting that cases of involuntary euthanasia are rare.
To suggest that assisted suicide would be the "thin end of the wedge" leading to involuntary euthanasia is like suggesting people should not be allowed to choose to make love because that is the "thin end of the wedge" towards sanctioning rape.
Involuntary euthanasia is a decision made by a third party on behalf of a person who is no longer in a position to make one that his/her life is burdensome and that death is more desirable.
He added: "Where euthanasia and assisted suicide has been liberalised there is a blurring beween voluntary and involuntary euthanasia.
The Netherlands has moved from assisted suicide to euthanasia, from euthanasia for people who are terminally ill to euthanasia for people who are chronically ill, from euthanasia for physical illnesses to euthanasia for psychological distress, and from voluntary euthanasia to involuntary euthanasia (called "termination of the patient without explicit request").