euthanasia

(redirected from Involuntary Euthanasia)
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Related to Involuntary Euthanasia: passive euthanasia, active euthanasia

eu·tha·na·sia

 (yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

[Greek euthanasiā, a good death : eu-, eu- + thanatos, death.]

euthanasia

(ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə) or

euthanasy

n
(Medicine) the act of killing someone painlessly, esp to relieve suffering from an incurable illness. Also called: mercy killing
[C17: via New Latin from Greek: easy death, from eu- + thanatos death]

eu•tha•na•sia

(ˌyu θəˈneɪ ʒə, -ʒi ə, -zi ə)

n.
Also called mercy killing. the act of putting to death painlessly or allowing to die, as by withholding medical measures from a person or animal suffering from an incurable, esp. a painful, disease or condition.
[1640–50; < New Latin < Greek euthanasía easy death]

euthanasia

1. the act of putting to death without pain a person incurably ill or suffering great pain; mercy killing.
2. an easy, painless death. — euthanasic, adj.
See also: Killing
the deliberate killing of painfully ill or terminally ill people to put them out of their misery. Also called mercy killing.
See also: Death
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)
kill, putting to death, killing - the act of terminating a life

euthanasia

noun mercy killing, assisted suicide the emotive question of whether euthanasia should be legalized
Translations
إماتَه رَحيمَه
eutanasimedlidenhedsdrab
eutanázia
líknardráp
eutanazijaneskausmingas numarinimas
eitanāzija
eutanázia
ötenazitatlı ölüm

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] Neutanasia f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪziə] neuthanasie f

euthanasia

nEuthanasie f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] neutanasia

euthanasia

(juːθəˈneiziə) noun
the painless killing of someone who is suffering from a painful and incurable illness. Many old people would prefer euthanasia to the suffering they have to endure.

eu·tha·na·si·a

n. eutanasia, muerte infringida sin sufrimiento en casos de una enfermedad incurable.

euthanasia

n eutanasia
References in periodicals archive ?
The recent cases of infants Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans in the United Kingdom, both of whom the National Health Service deemed not to warrant continued treatment despite their parents' wishes to seek treatment elsewhere, illustrate Kass's contention that "the line between voluntary and involuntary euthanasia cannot hold, and it will be effaced by the intermediate case of mentally impaired or comatose persons who are declared no longer willing to live because someone else wills them not to."
Main arguments of medical students with regard to legalising euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide In support Patient autonomy Relief of suffering In opposition Doctor's oath to preserve life Morally wrong--against personal/religious world view 'Slippery slope' towards active involuntary euthanasia Table 3.
Involuntary euthanasia refers to a situation in which the patient has the capacity to give consent, but has not done so; and in non-involuntary euthanasia a person is unable to give consent, for example because of dementia or being in a coma.
The underlying inspiration, or at least suspicion, that motivates this article is that insofar as the debate among philosophers has become reified, if not ossified, through standard distinctions, patterns of engagement and a canon of relevant articles and approaches--evidence of which can be readily found in any introductory applied ethics textbook or in the tens of thousands of essays produced annually by undergraduates on formulaic questions such as whether an act utilitarian ought to support active involuntary euthanasia for terminally ill patients or not--to that very extent philosophy loses its chance to play an active mediating role between public and specialised discourse and to prove itself truly relevant to public policy.
Involuntary euthanasia is regarded as a caring response to severe disabilities.
Cunningham would agree the really troubling cases of euthanasia that end someone's ability to be agents/subjects of their own lives are ones where competent individuals are killed without the informed consent owed to them and against their stated wishes--i.e., involuntary euthanasia.
In defense of the scorecard, Elizabeth Graham, the director of Texas Right to Life, said the legislation endorsed by the Catholic bishops "was an expansion of involuntary euthanasia and imposed death." She added, "We would not support any candidate who would support such a measure."
Involuntary euthanasia is bringing a patient's life to an end against their will.
(4) The justifications for this restriction include avoiding the possibility of abuse, preventing the risk of a slippery slope to involuntary euthanasia, or preserving the integrity of the medical profession.
In the case of the euthanasia notion we distinguish three forms: voluntary euthanasia, non-voluntary euthanasia and involuntary euthanasia. Voluntary euthanasia--when death is caused upon the request of the suffering person, non-voluntary euthanasia--when one ends the life of a person who cannot choose by himself between living and dying; involuntary euthanasia--when euthanasia is performed on a person who is able to provide informed consent, but does not, because he was not asked.
What he condemns most vigorously is involuntary euthanasia: "The choice of euthanasia becomes more serious when it takes the form of a murder committed by others on a person who has in no way requested it and who has never consented to it.