involution

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in·vo·lu·tion

 (ĭn′və-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of involving.
b. The state of being involved.
2. Intricacy; complexity.
3. Something, such as a long grammatical construction, that is intricate or complex.
4. Mathematics An operation, such as negation, which, when applied to itself, returns the original number.
5. Embryology The ingrowth and curling inward of a group of cells, as in the formation of a gastrula from a blastula.
6. Medicine
a. A decrease in size of an organ, as of the uterus following childbirth.
b. A progressive decline or degeneration of normal physiological functioning occurring as a result of the aging process.

[Latin involūtiō, involūtiōn-, from involūtus, past participle of involvere, to enwrap; see involve.]

in′vo·lu′tion·al adj.

involution

(ˌɪnvəˈluːʃən)
n
1. the act of involving or complicating or the state of being involved or complicated
2. something involved or complicated
3. (Zoology) zoology degeneration or structural deformation
4. (Biology) biology an involute formation or structure
5. (Physiology) physiol reduction in size of an organ or part, as of the uterus following childbirth or as a result of ageing
6. (Mathematics) an algebraic operation in which a number, variable, expression, etc, is raised to a specified power. Compare evolution5
7. (Grammar) grammar an involved construction, such as one in which the subject is separated from the predicate by an additional clause
ˌinvoˈlutional adj

in•vo•lu•tion

(ˌɪn vəˈlu ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of involving or entangling; involvement.
2. the state of being involved.
3. something complicated.
4. Biol. retrogression; restoration of a former state.
5. Physiol. the regressive changes in the body occurring with old age.
6. a complex grammatical construction in which the subject is separated from its predicate by intervening clauses or phrases.
7. a mathematical function that is its own inverse.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin involūtiō. See involve, -tion]
in`vo•lu′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.involution - reduction in size of an organ or part (as in the return of the uterus to normal size after childbirth)
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.involution - a long and intricate and complicated grammatical construction
grammatical construction, construction, expression - a group of words that form a constituent of a sentence and are considered as a single unit; "I concluded from his awkward constructions that he was a foreigner"
3.involution - marked by elaborately complex detail
complexity, complexness - the quality of being intricate and compounded; "he enjoyed the complexity of modern computers"
4.involution - the act of sharing in the activities of a groupinvolution - the act of sharing in the activities of a group; "the teacher tried to increase his students' engagement in class activities"
group action - action taken by a group of people
commitment - an engagement by contract involving financial obligation; "his business commitments took him to London"
intervention, intercession - the act of intervening (as to mediate a dispute, etc.); "it occurs without human intervention"
group participation - participation by all members of a group
5.involution - the process of raising a quantity to some assigned power
mathematical operation, mathematical process, operation - (mathematics) calculation by mathematical methods; "the problems at the end of the chapter demonstrated the mathematical processes involved in the derivation"; "they were learning the basic operations of arithmetic"
6.involution - the action of enfolding something
change of shape - an action that changes the shape of something
Translations

in·vo·lu·tion

n. involución, cambio retrógrado.
References in periodicals archive ?
NASR-ISFAHANI, Strongly amenable representations of involutive Banach algebras, Positivity 18 (2014), 395-412.
A useful approach to the management of hemangiomas can be based on the stage of the lesion (proliferative or involutive phase), type of lesion (supercial, deep, compound) and the management of residual deformity.
Serbanoiu and Tudor also state that physical activity is a "direct stimulus of the morphofunctional development, its absence could lead to adaptations of involutive type such as appearance of deficient postures, anxiety or depressive states and the increase of stress levels with major implications on individual health".
We show that if the two parts of a finite bipartite graph have the same degree sequence, then there is a bipartite graph, with the same degree sequences, which is symmetric, in that it has an involutive graph automorphism that interchanges its two parts.
complete and completely distributive lattice whose least and greatest elements are denoted by 0 and 1 respectively with an involutive order reversing operation ' : [Laplace] [right arrow] [Laplace]).
Administration of mulberry for 10 days has a pronounced antischistosomal activity where it diminished granuloma sizes extensively and decreased the number of involutive granulomas as compared with the infected control mice.
Chemical-binding is a means of life-experimentation, a means of becoming, which is involutive.
Their topics include asymptotic spherical analysis, the restriction of discrete series of semi-simple Lie groups to reductive subgroups, the extension of symmetric spaces and restrictions of Weyl groups and invariant polynomials, generalized Weil representations over involutive rings, and quasi-reductive supergroups.
Let L = (L, [less than or equal to]) be complete lattice with an involutive order reversing operation N : L [right arrow] L.
of Sao Carlos, Brazil) synthesize the major results from the past 25 years of developments in the theory of involutive systems of complex vector fields.
Their relation was almost an equivalence relation, and was defined on the set of frames whose Gramian matrices lie in a solid, inverse closed, involutive Banach algebra.