radiation therapy

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radiation therapy

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

radia′tion ther`apy


n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

radiation therapy

(also called radiotherapy) A method of treating disease, especially cancer, using X-rays or radioactivity to destroy malignant growths.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radiation therapy - (medicine) the treatment of disease (especially cancer) by exposure to a radioactive substanceradiation therapy - (medicine) the treatment of disease (especially cancer) by exposure to a radioactive substance
therapy - (medicine) the act of caring for someone (as by medication or remedial training etc.); "the quarterback is undergoing treatment for a knee injury"; "he tried every treatment the doctors suggested"; "heat therapy gave the best relief"
phototherapy - the use of strong light to treat acne or hyperbilirubinemia of the newborn
Curietherapy, radium therapy - the use of radium in radiation therapy
X-ray therapy - the therapeutic use of X rays
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ra·di·a·tion ther·a·py

, radiotherapy
n. terapia de radiación, tratamiento de un tumor o enfermedad por medio de radiaciones de radium o radon. V.: Radiotherapy.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients were randomized to receive two or four cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD), and some also received 20 or 30 Gy of involved-field radiation therapy. Overall, 96.6% of patients achieved complete remission at a median follow-up of 6.6 years with similar rates among treatment groups.
Thirty-nine percent received extended-field radiation therapy (defined as mantle or inverted Y fields), 30% received involved-field radiation therapy, and 31% received involved-nodal radiation therapy.