iodine

(redirected from Iodine deficiency)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Iodine deficiency: Magnesium deficiency

i·o·dine

 (ī′ə-dīn′, -dĭn, -dēn′)
n.
1. Symbol I A lustrous, purple-black, corrosive, poisonous halogen occurring as a diatomic molecule, I2, that easily sublimes to give a purple gas and is a trace element essential for proper thyroid function. Radioactive isotopes, especially I-131, are used as medical tracers and in thyroid disease diagnosis and therapy. Iodine compounds are used as germicides, antiseptics, and dyes. Atomic number 53; atomic weight 126.9045; melting point 113.7°C; boiling point 184.4°C; density of gas 11.27 grams per liter; specific gravity (solid, at 20°C) 4.93; valence 1, 3, 5, 7. See Periodic Table.
2. An antiseptic preparation containing iodine in solution, used to treat wounds.

[French iode, iodine (from Greek ioeidēs, violet-colored : ion, violet; akin to Latin viola; see viola2 + -oeidēs, -oid) + -ine.]

iodine

(ˈaɪəˌdiːn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a bluish-black element of the halogen group that sublimates into a violet irritating gas. Its compounds are used in medicine and photography and in dyes. The radioisotope iodine-131 (radioiodine), with a half-life of 8 days, is used in the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease. Symbol: I; atomic no: 53; atomic wt: 126.90447; valency: 1, 3, 5, or 7; relative density: 4.93; melting pt: 113.5°C; boiling pt: 184.35°C
[C19: from French iode, from Greek iōdēs rust-coloured, but taken to mean violet-coloured, through a mistaken derivation from ion violet]

i•o•dine

(ˈaɪ əˌdaɪn, -dɪn; in Chem. also -ˌdin)

also i•o•din

(-dɪn)

n.
a nonmetallic halogen element occurring as a grayish-black crystalline solid that sublimes to a dense violet vapor when heated: used as an antiseptic, as a nutritional supplement, and in radiolabeling. Compare radioiodine. Symbol: I; at. wt.: 126.904; at. no.: 53; sp. gr.: (solid) 4.93 at 20°C.
[1814; < French iode < Greek īṓdēs violet-colored, derivative of íon violet]

i·o·dine

(ī′ə-dīn′)
Symbol I A shiny, grayish-black halogen element that is corrosive and poisonous. It occurs in very small amounts in nature but is abundant in seaweed. Iodine compounds are used in medicine, antiseptics, and dyes. Atomic number 53. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.iodine - a nonmetallic element belonging to the halogensiodine - a nonmetallic element belonging to the halogens; used especially in medicine and photography and in dyes; occurs naturally only in combination in small quantities (as in sea water or rocks)
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
iodine-131 - heavy radioactive isotope of iodine with a half-life of 8 days; used in a sodium salt to diagnose thyroid disease and to treat goiter
iodine-125 - light radioactive isotope of iodine with a half-life of 60 days; used as a tracer in thyroid studies and as a treatment for hyperthyroidism
halogen - any of five related nonmetallic elements (fluorine or chlorine or bromine or iodine or astatine) that are all monovalent and readily form negative ions
brine, saltwater, seawater - water containing salts; "the water in the ocean is all saltwater"
2.iodine - a tincture consisting of a solution of iodine in ethyl alcohol; applied topically to wounds as an antiseptic
antiseptic - a substance that destroys micro-organisms that carry disease without harming body tissues
tincture - (pharmacology) a medicine consisting of an extract in an alcohol solution
Translations
jódjódová tinktura
jod
jodo
jood
jodi
jod
jód
joðjoîjoîáburîur
iodium
jodas
jods
iod
jódjódová tinktúra
jod
jod

iodine

[ˈaɪədiːn] Nyodo m

iodine

[ˈaɪədiːn] niode m

iodine

nJod nt

iodine

[ˈaɪəˌdiːn] niodio

iodine

(ˈaiədiːn) , ((American) -dain) noun
1. an element used in medicine and photography, forming black crystals.
2. a liquid form of the element used as an antiseptic.

io·dine

n. iodo, yodo.
1. elemento no metálico que pertenece al grupo halógeno usado como componente en medicamentos para contribuir al desarrollo y funcionamiento de la tiroides;
2. tintura de yodo usada como germicida y desinfectante.

iodine

n yodo
References in periodicals archive ?
Salma Shaikh said that Iodine deficiency has affected 11 million children in the world while not consuming Iodine was a reason associated with various mental issues reported of 43 million people.
According to the Nutrition Department of the Federal Ministry of Health, iodine deficiency is one of the most common health problems in Sudan .
Women with moderate to severe iodine deficiency may take longer to achieve a pregnancy, compared to women with normal iodine levels, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.
Multan -- Experts at a seminar warned on Tuesday Iodine deficiency could cause severe ailments like thyroid disorder, decline in intelligence and physical weakness, suggesting to the people to use iodised salt to avert the above mentioned issues.
However, the most damaging disorders induced by iodine deficiency (ID) are irreversible mental retardation and cretinism [3-5].
Iodine deficiency causes a spectrum of diseases called iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), which affect all stages of life from early pregnancy to the adult.
Summary: The Health Ministry and a host of other bodies launched an initiative Wednesday to address iodine deficiency in Lebanon, a widespread issue in the country.
Qureshi informed that the 40 percent women and 60 percent children are affected in Sindh alone due to iodine deficiency consequent to lack of awareness and wrong perceptions about iodine salt, non- implementation of laws, and inadequate performances of concerned management.
Iodine deficiency is a pressing problem in Lebanese population and it has dire and avoidable health consequences.
According to the WHO, Iodine deficiency is a public health problem in 130 countries of the 191 countries worldwide surveyed, the most affected regions are Africa and Southeast Asia (WHO / ICCIDD / UNICEF, 1999).
Iodine is needed for proper thyroid function, and iodine deficiency can cause hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) and goiter (an enlarged thyroid gland) in adults.
However, recent studies have shown that at least mild iodine deficiency is present in our country (1).