Antonescu

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Antonescu

(ˌæntɒˈnɛskjuː)
n
(Biography) Ion. 1882–1946, Romanian general and statesman; appointed prime minister (1940) by King Carol II. He was executed for war crimes
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As a result of this capitulation, the Garda de fier became more powerful and, after allying themselves with the Statul National Legionar (National Legionary State), the political party of the former Chief of the General Staff, General Ion Antonescu, forced the king to abdicate.
According to the Variety, the film, which also won the Europa Cinemas network prize and support, "employs a meta-structure historical immersion to convey a little-known chapter of WWII in which popular general Ion Antonescu led a massacre of Jews."
The king, while only in his early 20s, played a major part in switching Romania away from a wartime alliance with the Nazis, participating in a 1944 coup that overthrew the fascist leader Marshal Ion Antonescu. Romania then broke with Nazi Germany and switched to the Allied side.
Here Kaplan illuminates the fusion of the Latin West and the Greek East that created Romania, the country that gave rise to Ion Antonescu, Hitler's chief foreign accomplice during World War II, and the country that was home to the most brutal strain of Communism under Nicolae CeauE[TM]escu.
On September 4th, 1940, the King Carol II assigned the general Ion Antonescu to form the new government (Scurtu (coord.), 2003: 595), the next day, he invested Ion Antonescu, by a royal decree, with full powers to lead the Romanian state (Midan, 2008: 367).
In 1944, Romanian prime minister Ion Antonescu was dismissed by King Michael, paving the way for Romania to abandon the Axis in favor of the Allies.
Carol appointed Romania's top military leader, General Ion Antonescu, as prime minister on September 4, 1940.
L'analyse de la correspondance diplomatique pendant cette periode, confirme que la tension entre les deux pays a ete presente, les cas les plus significatifs etant l'expulsion des ingenieurs francais de Roumanie pendant l'ete de 1940 (1) ; la decision de Ion Antonescu du 11 septembre 1940, << de ramener au rang de Legation ses Ambassades a l'etranger (2) >>, donc aussi l'Ambassade de Roumanie en France ; la presence de l'attache militaire francais en Roumanie (3) ; la crise des ressortissants francais de Roumanie, etc.
Therefore we affirm that Ion Antonescu fell/Getting himself up.
This thoroughly researched and well executed study contends that Romanian ethnic purification efforts during World War II were not only the product of a preoccupation with such matters at the highest levels of the Romanian wartime regime--that is, Ion Antonescu and his (mostly military) henchmen--but were also the result of three developments in pre-war Romanian culture: the emergence in the 1930s of a radical racialist consensus in Romanian nationalist circles (Chapter 1), abetted by the success of the Romanian eugenics movement (Chapter 4), and implemented by the statist, social engineering proclivities of Romanian social scientists, particularly sociologists and demographers (Chapter 5).
The Romanian dictator Ion Antonescu refused Nazi orders to deport Romanian Jews to the concentration camps and killing factories of Poland and Lithuania.
The law emerged in the context of a Romanian political scene where political actors and private persons were making efforts to rehabilitate Ion Antonescu using the myth of the hero who saved his country or of the one who symbolically reunited the split parts of his country.