irenicism

(redirected from Irenicist)

irenicism

(aɪˈriːnɪˌsɪzəm)
n
the promotion and support of peace and conciliation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

irenicism

an advocacy of peace and conciliation. — irenicist, n.
See also: War
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The essays are divided in parts focusing on theological differences, the politics of conversion, and the irenicist union movement and pietism.
Others paid lip-service to such tenets: Leibniz seems to have believed in them passionately and while he was a life-long irenicist many of his theological stances (a firm Trinitarianism, for instance) were anything but radical.
Two centuries later, Desiderius Erasmus, the great Catholic humanist and irenicist, wrote similarly that the use of coercion is contrary to the nature of religion and, therefore, he argued for "the futility of persecution." (78) In a letter to John Carondolet, Erasmus wrote, "When faith is in the mouth rather than in the heart, when the solid knowledge of Sacred Scripture fails us, nevertheless by terrorization we drive men to believe what they do not believe, to love what they do not love, to know what they do not know.
Certainly not out of mutual antagonism, insists Erasmus, ever the irenicist. He had portrayed the early Christians as a concordant community earlier in the Paraphrase; he could not afford to allow hostility to be the cause of the division between two of their leaders.
Although an irenicist, Coornhert, known as the "gainsayer," seemed to thrive on controversy.
But Blair has additional reasons for an in-depth investigation: because the Theatrum combines "a traditional practice of natural philosophy" and "irenicist agenda .
Her study focuses on Witzel as Vermittlungstheologe, irenicist, and humanist.
Fulton's volume complements nicely Howard Louthan's The Quest for Compromise: Peacemakers in Counter-Reformation Vienna (1997), which dealt with the moderates or irenicists at the court of Vienna.
Sidney opens his Defence in the Vienna of Maximilian II, his chief place of residence during his three-year continental tour, where he spent several months reading and studying in the company of Languet and a variety of other irenicists and Philippists.
Though limited in numbers and ultimately in influence, these "irenicists" (as Louthan labels them) saw in the complaint of peace the best hope for imperial success.