Taxus baccata

(redirected from Irish Yew)
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Noun1.Taxus baccata - predominant yew in EuropeTaxus baccata - predominant yew in Europe; extraordinarily long-lived and slow growing; one of the oldest species in the world
yew - any of numerous evergreen trees or shrubs having red cup-shaped berries and flattened needlelike leaves
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References in periodicals archive ?
The dark green Irish yew, Taxus baccata Fastigiata, is perfect for creating an exclamation mark, rising out of ground cover such as ivy or periwinkle.
The dark green Irish yew, Taxus baccata 'Fastigiata', is perfect for creating an exclamation mark in planting because of its slender nature, rising out of ground cover such as ivy or periwinkle.
Planted at its base is an Irish yew tree taken as a cutting from the original ancient tree in Florence Court in Co Fermanagh.
A large mature English yew hedge, reputed to be more than 200 years old, and ?ve Irish yew topiary cones border the western side of the lawn along with a large herbaceous border which mirrors the yew hedge.
The Irish yew is an elegant, upright form of this plant, forming a column-like tree.
It's a line of bricks laid end-to-end, which starts at the right-hand corner of the grand Georgian house - the Spital - that is the current clubhouse, follows the edge of a red gravel forecourt, passes excruciatingly close to a tall Locust tree and an Irish Yew, and then zig-zags away around the putting green.
"The yew tree hedges and Irish yew walk, pleached and avenue lime trees, the formal ponds, pathways and trees all enhance the setting, and even though the house is closed for the winter it still looks splendid in the beautiful grounds."