Irishman

(redirected from Irishmen)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to Irishmen: Irishman, United Irishmen

I·rish·man

 (ī′rĭsh-mən)
n.
A man of Irish birth or ancestry.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Irishman

(ˈaɪrɪʃmən)
n, pl -men
(Peoples) a male native, citizen, or inhabitant of Ireland or a male descendant of someone Irish
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

I•rish•man

(ˈaɪ rɪʃ mən)

n., pl. -men.
a native or inhabitant of Ireland.
[1175–1225]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Irishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of IrelandIrishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of Ireland
Emerald Isle, Hibernia, Ireland - an island comprising the republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland
Irelander, Irish person - a native or inhabitant of Ireland
Mick, Mickey, Paddy - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Irish descent
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Ir
irer
irlantilainenirlantilainen mies
Irac
Írlendingur
アイルランド人男性
아일랜드 사람
ireirlending
irländare
ผู้ชายไอริช
đàn ông Ireland

Irishman

[ˈaɪərɪʃmən] N (Irishmen (pl)) → irlandés m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Irishman

[ˈaɪrɪʃmən] nIrlandais m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Irishman

[ˈaɪrɪʃmən] n (-men (pl)) → irlandese m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Irishman

إِيرْلَنْدِيٌّ Ir irer Ire Ιρλανδός irlandés irlantilainen mies Irlandais Irac irlandese アイルランド人男性 아일랜드 사람 Ier ire Irlandczyk irlandês ирландец irländare ผู้ชายไอริช İrlandalı đàn ông Ireland 爱尔兰人
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
The eyes of the Irishmen were angry and serious, and yet not all serious.
The mode of founding a college is, commonly, to get up a subscription of dollars and cents, and then, following blindly the principles of a division of labor to its extreme -- a principle which should never be followed but with circumspection -- to call in a contractor who makes this a subject of speculation, and he employs Irishmen or other operatives actually to lay the foundations, while the students that are to be are said to be fitting themselves for it; and for these oversights successive generations have to pay.
"What!" exclaim a million Irishmen starting up from all the shanties in the land, "is not this railroad which we have built a good thing?" Yes, I answer, comparatively good, that is, you might have done worse; but I wish, as you are brothers of mine, that you could have spent your time better than digging in this dirt.
Waters; and seeing two Irishmen unloading a scow of stone, I went, unasked, and helped them.
As they say, the persons who hate Irishmen most are Irishmen; so, assuredly, the greatest tyrants over women are women.
I recognised some unmistakable Irishmen, Frenchmen, some Sclaves, and a Greek, or a Candiote.
But he's in a proud tradition of Irishmen in the US.
LIVERPOOL playwright Lizzie Nunnery returns to The Everyman to premiere her new play with songs, To Have to Shoot Irishmen.
TWO Irishmen are on the verge of making it a double conquest of the world's most dangerous mountain.
In his analyses of Irishmen both in London and abroad, he provides detailed geographies and chronologies of such links without neglecting instances of linkages with non-Irish fellow Britons.
This didn't go down at all well with workers in Middlesbrough who thought, not unreasonably, that they should have been offered the job, and no sooner had the Irishmen started work a crowd of 400 of these townsmen tried to chase them off the site by pelting them with stones.
IN THE PAST TWENTY YEARS there has been considerable revision and reappraisal of our understandings of the United Irishmen, their ideology and political organization, and their relationships with their French allies.