iron oxide

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Related to Iron-oxide: FE2O3

iron oxide

n.
Any of various oxides of iron, such as ferric oxide or ferrous oxide.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fer′ric ox′ide



n.
a red crystalline compound, Fe2O3, used as a pigment, mordant, and coating for magnetic tape.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
raudoksiid
rautaoksidi

iron oxide

nossido di ferro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Iron-oxide nanoparticles are a special class of metal oxide nanoparticles with unique magnetic properties and superior biocompatibility.
Antibacterial Activity of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles.
In experiments, the scientists report that iron-oxide nanoparticles carrying the agent tumstatin were taken by blood vessels, meaning they should block blood vessel growth.
In a series of experiments, the team showed that iron-oxide nanoparticles ferrying the chemical tumstatin penetrated the blood vessels that sustain the tumor with oxygen and nutrients.
The researchers created the twin nanoparticle by binding one gold (Au) nanoparticle with an iron-oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticle.
In one scenario, the hematite is but one layer of a band of iron-rich mineral deposits, like the iron-oxide bands seen in Lake Superior and other large standing bodies of water on Earth.
High pouring temperature increases both the amount and rate of formation of an iron-oxide skin during pouring.
Thin films of synthetic garnet, an iron-oxide compound, have long played an important role as magnetic bubble memories, in which bits of digital data are stored as compact, circular regions, or domains, magnetized in the opposite direction of the thin magnetic film through which they move.
Brennan has also used "grazing-incidence" X-ray scattering to study the structure of thin iron-oxide films on various surfaces (a matter of interest to the magnetic recording industry) and to follow the growth of alternating layers of zinc and selenium atoms on a gallium-arsenide base.