Iroquoian

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Related to Iroquoian languages: Native American Languages

Ir·o·quoi·an

 (îr′ə-kwoi′ən)
n.
1. A family of North American Indian languages of the eastern part of Canada and the United States that includes Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, Tuscarora, Cherokee, Erie, Huron, and Wyandot.
2. A member of an Iroquoian-speaking people.
adj.
Of or constituting the Iroquoian language family.

Iroquoian

(ˌɪrəˈkwɔɪən)
n
(Languages) a family of North American Indian languages including Cherokee, Mohawk, Seneca, Oneida, and Onondaga: probably related to Siouan
adj
1. (Peoples) of or relating to the Iroquois, their culture, or their languages
2. (Languages) of or relating to the Iroquois, their culture, or their languages

Ir•o•quoi•an

(ˌɪr əˈkwɔɪ ən)

n.
1. a family of American Indian languages, including Huron, the languages of the Iroquois Five Nations, and Cherokee, spoken or formerly spoken in the E Great Lakes region and parts of the eastern U.S.
2. a member of an Iroquoian-speaking people.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Iroquois or the language family Iroquoian.
[1690–1700]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Iroquoian - a family of North American Indian languages spoken by the Iroquois
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Cherokee - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee
Cayuga - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Cayuga
Mohawk - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Mohawk
Seneca - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Seneca
Oneida - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Oneida
Onondaga - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Onondaga
Tuscarora - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Tuscarora
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast with Sierra Popoluca and the Iroquoian languages, languages of the Eskimo-Aleut family seem surprisingly devoid of coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
Once the foremost language of trade and diplomacy, believed even to be "the original language from which the other Iroquoian languages stemmed," Huron died "at the hands of Christianity.
The first, a language study developed in 1938 and carried out in 1939 and 1940, is recognized as instrumental in helping preserve Oneida and Iroquoian languages.