Irreconciliation

Ir`rec`on`cil`i`a´tion


n.1.Lack of reconciliation; disagreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wandering Narratives and Wavering Conclusions: Irreconciliation in Frances Burney's The Wanderer and Walter Scott's Waverley," European Romantic Review 12: 429-56
In The Philosophy of Evil, Paul Ziwek writes that Western thought often posits good and evil as rivalrous universal powers caught in a Zoroastrianianic, Manichaean, and Neo-Manichaean battle and irreconciliation (v).
Reconciliation with God in history means irreconciliation with history's gods.
Other projects examine the assumption that architecture domesticates our fears by positing how it also locates our fears; that light is the revealer of form by demonstrating that darkness also reveals; that architecture represents an irreconciliation and a reconciliation with nature; that it displaces as well as takes possession of a place; that it confronts and accommodates; that it objectifies and fulfills desire; that "man is off-center of divine creation"; and, in the Oxygen House, the last project, that a house is for living as well as for dying.
It is instead an irreconciliation inside Isabella and Angelo (and possibly Duke Vincentio) themselves, a division between the ascetic and social sides of their personalities, between their love of "the life remov'd" (1.
Naturally, Majaj's firm answer to all the irreconciliations of her culturally diverse and divided life is a humanistic approach to them to a greater extent.