Isiac


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Isiac

relating to the religious practices and objects involving the goddess Isis.
See also: God and Gods
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Apudeius designed The Golden Ass as a Silenus box, and appropriately he included other box motifs that are central to the novel in a number of analogous ways: the inverted Silenus box that is used to tempt and entrance Psyche; the various ritual boxes and boxlike private places that are used, respectively, to contain and enact the secrets of the Isiac rite in book eleven; and, most inclusively, the box-within-box or tale-within-a-tale narrative structure of the Milesian stories.
Spenser's double invocation of Isiac myth to represent the embodiment of, and location of, Britomart's transformation reinforces the intentionality of his allusion to Plutarch's version of the myth.
7) Others have seen Isiac hints early in the novel in the names of Socrates' and Aristomenes' supernatural tormentors, Meroe and Panthia--Meroe, the name of an Isiac sanctuary on the Upper Nile; and Panthia, strikingly close to "Panthea" ("All-Divine"), a common epithet applied to the goddess Isis.
33) The very asinine form of Lucius may foreshadow his eventual Isiac salvation: at Met.
18) Lucius, as a speechless animal, could not have related this information to anyone, so the double-dream of the Isiac high priest and Lucius has to be god-sent.
The Christian worship, in the view of many in the second century, is clothed in secrecy and deeds of darkness; the Isiac religion celebrates openly in public parades.
is less straightforward, with additional inserted tales and the unusual Isiac ending, which complicates matters and, instead of answering questions, raises a few more, including the issue of the meaning of the text.
3,15,4) is, on the one hand, contrasted with the blessings of Isiac religion (11,15,1 nec tibi natales ne dignitas quidem uel ipsa, qua flores, usquam doctrina profuit, 'not your birth, nor even your position, nor even your fine education has been of any help whatever to you'), but enables, on the other hand, Lucius' rhetorical and literary success in Rome (11,27,9; 11,30,4).
1), but also how the multiplicity of the ego of the Prologue ought to be kept in mind when reading the character of Lucius the Isiac initiate in Book 11.
A third challenge is to take position in the highly debated issue of Book Eleven, which has led to various, conflicting interpretations, since some scholars view the novel's ending as satirical parody of a religious fanatic, and others as a serious account of an Isiac convert's redemption after his fall, caused by a fatal enslavement to false pleasures and curiosity for unhealthy magic.
But the Isiac cult's requirement for extreme financial sacrifice which has troubled some readers of Apuleius, even at one point makes Lucius himself a doubter of the sincerity of the priests (11.
Pointing to the Isiac and Egyptian associations of sundials and time-telling, Beck shows that Lucius/Apuleius playfully weaves together three essential themes: Egypt, Rome, and the Sun.