Islamicist


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Is·la·mi·cist

 (ĭs-lä′mĭ-sĭst, ĭz-)
n.
1. A specialist in the study of Islam.
2. A member or supporter of an Islamic revivalist movement; an Islamist.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Islamicist

(ɪzˈlæmɪˌsɪst)
n
1. (Islam) a specialist in the study of Islam
2. (Islam) same as Islamist2
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

Islamicist

[ɪzˈlæmɪsɪst] Nislamista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Islamicist

nIslamist(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The church historian found flaws only in its treatment of Christianity, the Islamicist only in its treatment of Islam.
(32) The categories used here--"modernist", "Islamist" and "hybridized Islamicist"--are inherently problematic, and would doubtless be queried by some scholars of Islam.
Herman Melville used Islamicist conventions to "infidelize the moral majority of his age, and perhaps, even allude to the despotism of his country," ridicule the Protestant work ethic, and expose the self-deceptive tenets of western "snivelization." Women, too, used Islam to strike a blow at America's despotic conventions.
He demonized the Islamic Republic as the leader of a global, radical Islamicist menace that supposedly threatened not only Israel but also America and its Arab allies.
In the U.S., religiosity has been channeled into electoral politics while in Europe secularist ideals have been reinforced by the challenge of Islamicist extremism.
In this study, Marr examines American perceptions about the Muslim world and use of Islamicist concepts during the period 1783-1865.
It is harder to forgive her for overlooking 9/11 of 2001, in which a small number of technically competent Islamicist barbarians, heavily armed with fanatical indifference to human life, including their own, succeeded in attacking two major cities of the greatest power on earth, killing 3000 people, shattering whole industries, and causing billions of dollars in economic damage.
The first, "The Churches of the Middle East," includes two essays by specialists: David Kerr, Islamicist and theologian of Muslim-Christian relations, and Riad Jarjour, general secretary of the MECC.
Written before the events of September 11, 2001, this book by a prominent Western Islamicist challenges Muslims worldwide to reexamine their own culture, providing a historical context in which to do so.
His support for Islamicist terror organizations from Kashmir through Chechnya shows the breadth of his ambitions.
Moderate Muslims showed a good example of this recently when they joined in worldwide protests against the action of the Islamicist regime in Afganistan's decision to blow up statues of the Buddha.
During the 1950s, to compound Christian problems, the rise of Islamicist movements (inappropriately called "fundamentalists" in the Western press) commenced.