Isle of Pines


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Isle of Pines

n
(Placename) the former name of (Isle of) Youth
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
"With old Deluse at the 'Isle of Pines,'" {1} was the laughing reply; "and a glum enough time I had of it.
Across the willow-lake a temple shines, Pale, through the lotus-girdled isle of pines, And twilight listens to the drip of oars -- The coming of dark boats with scented stores Of orange seed; the mist leans from the hill, While palm leaves sway 'twixt wind and water chill, And waves of smoke like phantoms rise and fade Into a trembling tangle of green jade.
Lichauco was born on the Isle of Pines, now known as Isla de la Juventud, a small island off the coast of Cuba.
"Why is it that people who know all about the infamous prison on Robben Island in South Africa [where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned] have never heard of the prison on Cuba's Isle of Pines? Why is Marxism still taken seriously on college campuses and in the progressive press?
The film opens with an introduction of Jessie, whose life begins on the Isle of Pines, an island close to Cuba, where she is born to an American father and a mother who passes away when Jessie is still young.
The only thing missing is the aroma of that tropical flower from America or Asia called vanilla I crumble on the cape white Italian foam of an obese Franciscan friar from Spain whose flesh overflows the coffee laced with soy from Mexico barefoot steaming in those cups of virgin ceramic from Isle of Pines gift from my sister Tarcila who is no longer with us and is everywhere now.
The property is located in the Isle of Pines subdivision on the shores of Lake Mary Jane.
Isla de la Juventud (Isle of Youth) known until 1978 as Isla de Pinos (Isle of Pines)--is the largest of all the islands and islets within Cuban territory.
The Isle of Pines, 1668: Henry Neville's Uncertain Utopia.
Called A New and Further Discovery of The Isle of Pines, it does not continue the narrative of castaways who create a paradise by breaking all the rules of polite society, he says, but brings further complications to almost every aspect of the already complicated original.
Henry Neville's 1688 text The Isle of Pines has appeared in various collections of utopian literature and seventeenth-century republican texts, but John Scheckter's edition is the first of its kind.