Ismaili

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Related to Isma'ilis: Nizari Ismailis

Is·ma·i·li

 (ĭs′mä-ē′lē) also Is·ma·i·li·an (-ē′lē-ən)
n. pl. Is·ma·i·lis also Is·ma·i·li·ans
A member of a branch of Shiism that follows a living imam and is noted for esoteric philosophy.

[Arabic Isma'īlīy, after Isma'īl (died 760), son of the sixth imam, Jafar (700?-765).]

Ismaili

(ˌɪzmɑːˈiːlɪ) or

Isma'ili

npl -lis
1. (Islam) a Shiah sect whose adherents believe that Ismail, son of the sixth imam, was the rightful seventh imam
2. (Islam) Also called: Ismailian a member of this sect
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ismaili - an adherent of Ismailism; a member of the Ismaili branch of Shiism
adherent, disciple - someone who believes and helps to spread the doctrine of another
Adj.1.Ismaili - of or relating to a branch of Shiism that is noted for its esoteric philosophy
References in periodicals archive ?
Proofs of prophecy and refutations of the Isma'ilis were both major genres of discourse at the time, she says.
However, the entire Shi'ite movement - including the Zaidis, the Isma'ilis, the Druze, the Alawites, etc.
Al-Husayni, Akhbar 106; al-Bundari, Zubdat al-nusra, 175, who points out that this was only after the atabeg Aqsunqur was assassinated by the Isma'ilis (for this event, ibid.
The Shi'a schools are Ja'fari, Isma'ilis, and Zaydis, and the Sunni schools are Hanafi, Maliki, Shafi'i, and Hanbali.
Assassin' was a local name, applied only to the Isma'ilis of Syria.
But the entire Shi'ite sect (which consists of many sub-sects like the Zaidi Shi'ites of Yemen, the Isma'ilis of the GME and other parts of the world, the Alawites of Syria and Turkey, the Druze of Lebanon, Syria and Israel; etc).
Northeastern provinces have a substantial population of Isma'ilis, a Shiite Muslim sect often called "Seveners" (believers in the Seventh Imam as the true Imam).
But the entire Shi'ite sect (which consists of many sub-sects like the Zaidis of Yemen, the Isma'ilis of the GME and other parts of the world, the Alawites of Syria and Turkey, the Druze of Lebanon, Syria and Israel; etc) accounts for 4-6% of the entire Muslim world of around 1.
Later he declared himself caliph of all Muslims, and pressed a campaign to root out all other Muslim and non-Muslim minorities, like the Shi'ites (including the Ja'faris, Zaidis, Isma'ilis, Alawites & Druze), Ayzidis (a Kurdish stock originating from Zoroastrianism), Christians, etc.
Besides the "Twelvers" there are Zayyidis in Yemen, Alawis in Syria (the religion of the Assad regime) and Isma'ilis living in many locations throughout the world.
The beginning is provided by the disquieting presentation of a paradise ruled by a murderer--the famous "Old Man of the Mountain" (see Daftary, The Isma'ilis 19; see also Fleischhauer; Nowell) described in detail by Marco Polo (Benedetto 49-53; see also Daftary, The Assassin who thinks Odoric's passage originated almost completely from Polo's book).
Throughout its long timeline, from the fourth/ninth century to the eighth/ thirteenth century, the Kalam discourse was largely dominated by the dialectics of Ash'aris, Traditionalists, Mu'tazilis, and Shi'is (especially Zaydis and Isma'ilis to some extent).