Ismail Pasha


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Is·ma·il Pa·sha

 (ĭs-mä′ēl pä′shə) 1830-1895.
Egyptian viceroy (1863-1879). The Suez Canal was completed during his reign (1869).

Ismail Pasha

(ˌɪzmɑːˈiːl ˈpɑːʃə)
n
(Biography) 1830–95, viceroy (1863–66) and khedive (1867–79) of Egypt, who brought his country close to bankruptcy. He was forced to submit to Anglo-French financial control (1876) and to abdicate (1879)
References in periodicals archive ?
Manuscripts of Opera Aida were found in the Nile Valley, written by the French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette, who was commissioned by Khedive Ismail Pasha. Giuseppe Verdi composed "Opera Aida" for 150,000 gold francs in 1870, while Khedive Ismail Pasha had the Khedivial Opera House built in only six months to host the Opening of the Suez Canal celebrations.
The idea of a museum in Egypt dedicated to Islamic art and archaeology began during the rule of Ismail Pasha (the grandson of Mohammed Ali Pasha), who was khedive of Egypt and Sudan from 1863 to 1879.
He assesses theatrical productions, journals, and history texts during the reign of Khedive Ismail Pasha [r.
He said they include five mummies, one of which was offered in its original coffin to Dom Pedro II by Egyptian Viceroy Ismail Pasha during a visit to the Middle East.
Written by legendary Poet Antonio Ghislanzoni and composed by the celebrated Italian Composer Giuseppe Verdi, "Opera Aida" debuted in 1871 under orders from Ismail Pasha -- Khedive of Egypt -- in celebration of the opening of the Suez Canal.
Al-Sisi reviewed the experiment of the parliamentary life in the country since the formation of a first legislature upon a decree by Khedive Ismail Pasha in 1866.
It was woven and designed with devotion under the supervision of the Khedive Ismail Pasha, the ruler of Egypt at the time, the grandson of Muhammad Ali Pasha, considered to be the founder of modern Egypt, and the ruler of Egypt between the years 1805 to 1848.
The Suez Canal Company dug part of the canal, which irrigates the Qaliubiya and Eastern provinces, with Ismail Pasha completing the rest, according to an agreement between the two parties.
The building is an architectural work of art, built by Mohamed Ali Pasha in 1828 in remembrance of his dear son, Ismail Pasha, who had died in Sudan in 1822.
Ismail Pasha answered the old sheikh's request with an ultimatum.
Ismail Pasha, Khedive of Egypt, commissioned Verdi to write it for performance in January 1871, paying him 150,000 francs, but the premiere was delayed because of the Franco-Prussian War.
A serious interest in antique Islamic glass began in 1860, when Ismail Pasha ascended the throne of Egypt transforming the country with an ambitious development programme that attracted European businessmen to Egypt.