isoflavone

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Related to Isoflavones: Soy isoflavones

i·so·fla·vone

 (ī′sō-flā′vōn′)
n.
1. A crystalline compound, C15H10O2, that is an isomer of flavone.
2. Any of various derivatives of this compound that are found as glycosides in many plants, especially soybeans, and that often have weak estrogenic activity.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

isoflavone

(ˌaɪsəʊˈfleɪvəʊn)
n
(Complementary Medicine) one of a class of phytoestrogens, found in soya beans and marketed as a health supplement
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Soy isoflavones and peptides may inhibit the growth of microbial pathogens that cause food-borne illnesses.
Soy foods, which include tofu, tempeh, soy milk, and edamame, contain isoflavones, compounds that are similar in some ways to the hormone estrogen.
Soy foods such as tofu, soy milk, and edamame contain isoflavones, compounds that are similar in some ways to the hormone estrogen.
Isoflavones are bioactive metabolites that constitutes a well-known group of phytoestrogens, the amounts of which increase in the case of plant stress [3, 4].
An article in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism reveals a potential benefit of soy isoflavones for women with polycystic ovary syndrome--a disorder characterized by mildly elevated male hormones and insulin which is associated with weight gain, infertility, and a greater risk of diabetes and coronary heart disease.
Anecdotal evidence suggests beneficial effects of soy isoflavones on PMS management because of their influence on endogenous oestrogen and actions on specific tissues.
The study - conducted by the Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Arak University of Medical Sciences, and Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences in Iran - examined how a diet containing soy isoflavones could benefit women with PCOS.
Objective: The purpose of this review is to discuss some critical issues of isoflavones protective against the development of prostate cancer (PCa).
Soybeans contain chemicals that are structurally similar to estrogen (called isoflavones), so they could help enhance bone health and reduce the risk of fractures.
Since soybean foods contain plant chemicals called isoflavones that mimic the hormone, it has been suggested they might combat some effects of the menopause.
Objective To demonstrate the effect of soy isoflavones on acne vulgaris (AV) lesions in female patients.