isogloss

(redirected from Isoglosses)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

i·so·gloss

 (ī′sə-glôs′, -glŏs′)
n.
A geographic boundary line delimiting the area in which a given linguistic feature occurs.

[iso- + Greek glōssa, language, tongue.]

i′so·gloss′al adj.

isogloss

(ˈaɪsəʊˌɡlɒs)
n
(Linguistics) a line drawn on a map around the area in which a linguistic feature is to be found, such as a particular pronunciation of a given word
ˌisoˈglossal, ˌisoˈglottic, ˌisoˈglossic, ˌisoˈglottal adj

i•so•gloss

(ˈaɪ səˌglɒs, -ˌglɔs)

n.
(in the study of the geographical distribution of dialects) a line on a map marking the limits of an area within which a feature of speech occurs, as the use of a particular word or pronunciation.
[< German (1892)]
i`so•glos′sal, adj.
Translations
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Genealogical Classification of Semitic: The Lexical Isoglosses. Berlin: de Gruyter.
Dr Iwan Wyn Rees from Cardiff University says that although different versions of the language have traditionally been represented by isoglosses - lines on a map marking an area with a distinct linguistic feature - his work has shown that Welsh dialects are very much on a continuum and that transition zones are found between the main varieties of Welsh.
Dr Iwan Wyn Rees from Cardiff University says that although different versions of the language have traditionally been represented by isoglosses - lines on a map marking an area with a distinct linguistic feature -- his work has shown that Welsh dialects are very much on a continuum and that transition zones are found between the main varieties of Welsh.
In this chapter, we find new corpus data on speech variability of consonants and a conclusion that "the consonantal system of Estonian is losing typical Circum-Baltic isoglosses, at the same time coming closer to currently dominating European languages" (p.
Filomeno Mata is grouped by MacKay and Trechsel (2014) in the Northern branch, based on shared morphological characteristics, and it does seem to be the case that this language also shares a few lexical forms with the Northern languages; however, the bulk of the lexical isoglosses, as well as statistical measures of lexical similarity, seem to point to a closer affiliation with Lowland-Sierra.
The book begins by discussing lexicostatistics as applied to the Semitic languages and reviewing the previous history of lexical isoglosses in Semitic.
Orthographic variations, it seems, must reflect variations in the phonetic reality which is essential for the reconstruction of pronunciation and consequently for the establishment of isoglosses. (Fisiak 1982: 120)
The verbal texture is continually rich, with many colourful terms--espadrilles, lollop, caravelle, cummerbunds, asdic, invaginating, squarrous, isoglosses, homophones, strawstalks, reprographics, ruched, pica, kenosis--to offer only a tiny sample.
As a result he proved that there is indeed a perception and awareness of variation, since geographic labels from respondents, though less accurate, were considerably close to the actual isoglosses. Preston highlighted the importance of the differences between actual dialectological boundaries, and perceptual dialectological boundaries.
Only one symbology type, the use of isoglosses, is unique to language maps.
He argues as well that myth possesses its own geography, which allows drawing "what linguists would call the isoglosses of a myth, the lines which limit the social region where it is spoken.