weight training

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weight training

n.
Weightlifting done as a training program for improving or maintaining overall fitness, strength, or endurance.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

weight training

n
(Weightlifting) physical exercise involving lifting weights to improve muscle performance
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

weight′ train`ing


n.
weightlifting done as a conditioning exercise.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

weight training

n to do weight trainingallenarsi con i pesi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, isokinetic exercises were associated with significant improvements in both average proprioceptive errors and function tests.
Several exercise protocols (Ahmed et al., 2014; Franca et al., 2012; Moon et al., 2013; Sertpoyraz et al., 2009), which include conventional home exercises, low back school programs, stretching exercises, and dynamic and concentric isokinetic exercises, decrease MODQ scores.
This program consisted of curls, free weights and isokinetic exercises using a Cybex 340.
In the present study, we hypothesized that isokinetic and aerobic exercises would increase the muscle strength at the expense of reduction in the cartilage volume and both effects would be stronger after isokinetic exercises. Our second hypothesis was that isometric exercise would not alter the isokinetic muscle strength or cartilage morphology, but would reduce symptoms and increase the functional capacity.
The carryover effects may be attractive to strength training and conditioning professionals seeking to include isokinetic exercises into a resistance training program.
In this study, which involved 60[degrees]/s and 180[degrees]/s isokinetic exercises controlled by a dynamometer, the biceps brachii muscle demonstrated a higher motor unit potential at weeks 2 and 6, whereas the brachioradialis muscle showed the highest potential at week 2.
Isokinetic exercises consisting of several sets of maximal concentric and/or eccentric contractions have been used to study neuromuscular fatigue (Babault et al., 2006; Lin namo et al., 2000; Michaut et al., 2003).
In addition, the studies that used maximal eccentric isokinetic exercises to induce injury, elaborated models with higher angular speeds (Chen, 2003; Evans et al., 2002; Linnamo et al., 2000; Lund et al., 1998; Prou et al., 1999).