isolationism

(redirected from Isolationsim)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

i·so·la·tion·ism

 (ī′sə-lā′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A national policy of abstaining from political or economic relations with other countries.

i′so·la′tion·ist n. & adj.

isolationism

(ˌaɪsəˈleɪʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a policy of nonparticipation in or withdrawal from international affairs
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an attitude favouring such a policy
ˌisoˈlationist n, adj

i•so•la•tion•ism

(ˌaɪ səˈleɪ ʃəˌnɪz əm, ˌɪs ə-)

n.
the policy or doctrine that peace and economic advancement can best be achieved by isolating one's country from alliances and commitments with other countries.
[1920–25, Amer.]
i`so•la′tion•ist, n., adj.

isolationism

the policy or doctrine directed toward the isolation of a country from the affairs of other nations by a deliberate abstention from political, military, and economic agreements. — isolationist, n.
See also: Politics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isolationism - a policy of nonparticipation in international economic and political relations
foreign policy - a policy governing international relations
Translations
izolacionizam
izolacionizmus

isolationism

[ˌaɪsəʊˈleɪʃənɪzəm] Naislacionismo m

isolationism

[ˌaɪsəˈleɪʃənɪzəm] nisolationnisme m

isolationism

isolationism

[ˌaɪsəˈleɪʃˌnɪzm] nisolazionismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, Hardy's statistical collocations make such insights more readily available and serve as a check on critical blindspots; they lead him to understand O'Connor's formulation of the poignant consequences of hubris: "The cult of self-reliance is mixed frequently in O'Connor with isolationsim and tragic naivete" (121).
A 1999 book, "Misreading the Public: The Myth of a New Isolationsim" by University of Maryland scholars Steven Kull and I.M.
Taruskin, Leech-Wilkinson and Temperly accuse it of acquiring airs of 'moral superiority' and cite instances of devotee critics 'condemning other styles of performance as "wrong" or "unjustified" '.(2) Leppard speaks of 'its having sometimes resulted in restriction and a sort of mean-spirited isolationsim, promoting the formation of musical cults'.(3) Dreyfus wishes to rescue it 'from its moralizing devotees'.(4) And Kerman describes authenticity as a 'baleful term which has caused endless acrimony' for its association among other things with 'art connoisseurs who evoke it to confound forgery'.(5)