isostasy

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Related to Isostacy: eustasy

i·sos·ta·sy

 (ī-sŏs′tə-sē)
n.
Equilibrium in the earth's crust such that the forces tending to elevate landmasses balance the forces tending to depress landmasses.

[iso- + Greek stasis, a standstill; see stā- in Indo-European roots + -y.]

i′so·stat′ic (ī′sō-stăt′ĭk) adj.
i′so·stat′i·cal·ly adv.

isostasy

(aɪˈsɒstəsɪ) or

isostacy

n
(Geological Science) the state of balance, or equilibrium, which sections of the earth's lithosphere (whether continental or oceanic) are thought ultimately to achieve when the vertical forces upon them remain unchanged. The lithosphere floats upon the semifluid asthenosphere below. If a section of lithosphere is loaded, as by ice, it will slowly subside to a new equilibrium position; if a section of lithosphere is reduced in mass, as by erosion, it will slowly rise to a new equilibrium position
[C19: iso- + -stasy, from Greek stasis a standing]
isostatic adj

i•sos•ta•sy

or i•sos•ta•cy

(aɪˈsɒs tə si)

n.
1. the equilibrium of the earth's crust, a condition in which the forces tending to elevate balance those tending to depress.
2. the state in which pressures from every side are equal.
[1889; iso- + -stasy < Greek -stasia; see stasis, -y3]
i•so•stat•ic (ˌaɪ səˈstæt ɪk) adj.

isostasy

the general equality of pressure in the crust of the earth. — isostatic, adj.
See also: Geology

isostasy

The state of balance of the Earth’s crust as it floats on the denser mantle. Mountains are balanced by deep roots of crustal rock.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isostasy - (geology) a general equilibrium of the forces tending to elevate or depress the earth's crust
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
equilibrium - a stable situation in which forces cancel one another
Translations
isostasia
izosztázia
References in periodicals archive ?
As it was mentioned before, the period before 7500 yr BP included some dramatic, eustatic sea level variations due to glacial melting with time-varying rates, tectonic uplift and glacial isostacy (Muru et al.
The principle of isostacy applied to Land and Water Hemispheres of the Earth.