italic


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I·tal·ic

 (ĭ-tăl′ĭk, ī-tăl′-)
adj.
1. Of or relating to ancient Italy or its peoples or cultures.
2. Of or relating to the branch of the Indo-European language family that includes Latin, Faliscan, Oscan, Umbrian, and the Romance languages.
3. italic Of or being a style of printing type patterned on a Renaissance script with the letters slanting to the right: This sentence is printed in italic type.
n.
1. The Italic branch of Indo-European.
2. often italics Italic print or typeface.

[Latin Italicus, from Italia, Italy.]

italic

(ɪˈtælɪk)
adj
Also: Italian of, relating to, or denoting a style of handwriting with the letters slanting to the right
n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a style of printing type modelled on this, chiefly used to indicate emphasis, a foreign word, etc. Compare roman1
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (often plural) italic type or print
[C16 (after an edition of Virgil (1501) printed in Venice and dedicated to Italy): from Latin Italicus of Italy, from Greek Italikos]

Italic

(ɪˈtælɪk)
n
(Languages) a branch of the Indo-European family of languages that includes many of the ancient languages of Italy, such as Venetic and the Osco-Umbrian group, Latin, which displaced them, and the Romance languages
adj
(Languages) denoting, relating to, or belonging to this group of languages, esp the extinct ones

i•tal•ic

(ɪˈtæl ɪk, aɪˈtæl-)

adj.
1. designating or pertaining to a style of printing types in which the letters usu. slope to the right, used for emphasis, to separate different kinds of information, etc.
2. (cap.) of or pertaining to ancient Italy and its peoples prior to the expansion of Rome in the 3rd to 1st centuries b.c.
n.
3. Often, italics. italic type.
4. (cap.) a family of languages, a branch of the Indo-European family, that was spoken in ancient Italy and includes Latin, Osco-Umbrian, and, in most classifications, Venetic.
[1555–65; < Latin Italicus < Greek]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.italic - a style of handwriting with the letters slanting to the rightitalic - a style of handwriting with the letters slanting to the right
cursive, cursive script, longhand, running hand - rapid handwriting in which letters are set down in full and are cursively connected within words without lifting the writing implement from the paper
2.Italic - a branch of the Indo-European languages of which Latin is the chief representative
Indo-European language, Indo-Hittite, Indo-European - the family of languages that by 1000 BC were spoken throughout Europe and in parts of southwestern and southern Asia
Osco-Umbrian - a group of dead languages of ancient Italy; they were displace by Latin
Latin - any dialect of the language of ancient Rome
3.italic - a typeface with letters slanting upward to the right
font, fount, typeface, face, case - a specific size and style of type within a type family
Adj.1.italic - characterized by slanting characters; "italic characters"
2.Italic - of or relating to the Italic languages; "ancient Italic dialects"
Translations
حَرْف مائِل
psaný kurzivou
kursiv
dõlt betû
skáletraîur
kursyvaskursyvinisparašyti kursyvu
kursīvs
kursiv
eğik yazıitalik

italic

[ɪˈtælɪk] ADJ (Typ) → en cursiva or bastardilla

italic

[ɪˈtælɪk]
adjitalique italics
nplitalique m
printed in italics → imprimé en italique

italic

adjkursiv; italic typeKursivdruck m; italic scriptKurrentschrift f
n italics
plKursivschrift f, → Kursive f; in italicskursiv (gedruckt)

italic

[ɪˈtælɪk] adj (handwriting) → corsivo/a

italic

(iˈtӕlik) , (aiˈtalik) adjective
(of print) of the sloping kind used eg to show emphasis and for the examples in this dictionary. This example is printed in italic type.
iˈtalicize, iˈtalicise (-saiz) verb
to put (words) in italics.
iˈtalics noun plural
italic print. This example is printed in italics.
References in classic literature ?
I then commenced and continued copying the Italics in Webster's Spelling Book, until I could make them all without looking on the book.
The words in italics were mutilated by the telegraph in transmission from Australia, and reaching the company in the form mentioned above gave rise to the mistake.
EXCEPT Gilbert -- AND Charlie Sloane," said Diana, imitating Anne's italics and slyness.
She forgot to send any message of kindness to Lady O'Dowd, as her wont was--and did not mention Glorvina by name, and only in italics, as the Major's BRIDE, for whom she begged blessings.
THE FORMER SEEMS TO BE MUCH THE MORE IMPORTANT (The italics are mine.
The italics in these extracts, as in the foregoing, are my own.
xlsx file type) stored in the system and it also uses the same font sizes and types - bold, italic, colors and underline.
If you are an imposing sort of person who does not hanker after leanness or fitness but is happy with your life and with your love handles, then Cooper Black Italic is your type.
the Romanization of French reading habits and, as one of its effects in the centuries to follow, the `Francisation' of European type design (as far as Roman, Italic, Greek, and Hebrew typefaces are concerned)" (p.
the Netherlands), is the Italic part of the project Indo-European Etymological Dictionary, which was initiated in 1991 for the purposes of compiling a new and comprehensive etymological dictionary of the inherited vocabulary of the Indo-European languages, replacing the outdated dictionary of Pokorny (1959).
For example, Aldus Manutius was a "first-class business man" who developed italics because he wanted to print the classics in smaller books and sell them.
5) Of Aldus's italic octavo imprints of 1501 and 1502, the Lyonese had copied all but the 1502 Cicero (Epistolae familiares), Statius, Valerius Maximus, and the three volumes of Ovid, and the last two authors were to appear, in all likelihood, before the end of 1503.