Ivan IV

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Related to Ivan: Ivan Pavlov, Ivan Lendl, Iban

Ivan IV

n
(Biography) known as Ivan the Terrible. 1530–84, grand duke of Muscovy (1533–47) and first tsar of Russia (1547–84). He conquered Kazan (1552), Astrakhan (1556), and Siberia (1581), but was defeated by Poland in the Livonian War (1558–82) after which his rule became increasingly oppressive
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Ivan IV - the first czar of Russia (1530-1584)Ivan IV - the first czar of Russia (1530-1584)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"Now the head-man of these Russians was Ivan. He it was, with his two thumbs, who drove out the eyes of Kinoos.
I saw the Russian, Ivan, who thrust out my father's eyes, lay the lash of his dog-whip upon thee and beat thee like a dog.
Oona made no effort to hide her surprise and chagrin that Ivan was not dead, but went on:
These were, however, reassured by his confidential servant, Ivan, the old man with a scar, and a face almost as grey as his moustaches, who always sat at a table in the entrance hall--a hall hung with weapons.
As Ivan explained to the guests, their host had telephoned that he was detained for ten minutes.
Simon, I think you know where to find my man, Ivan, in the front hall; he is a confidential man.
Levin looked more attentively at Ivan Parmenov and his wife.
Yet it was necessary for him to get up because Ivan Matveich, the police-officer, would soon call for him and he had to go with him--either to bargain for the forest or to put Mukhorty's breeching straight.
He whom he was expecting came; not Ivan Matveich the police-officer, but someone else--yet it was he whom he had been waiting for.
I return the injury sevenfold, as Ivan Petrovitch Ptitsin says.
"I am of your opinion on that last point," said Ivan Fedorovitch, with ill-concealed irritation.
However far he has walked, whatever strange, unknown, and dangerous places he reaches, just as a sailor is always surrounded by the same decks, masts, and rigging of his ship, so the soldier always has around him the same comrades, the same ranks, the same sergeant major Ivan Mitrich, the same company dog Jack, and the same commanders.